Train conductor: old-fashioned or not?

< Previous | Next >

JP/Belgium

New Member
Français - Belgique
Hello,

I'd like to know if the word 'train conductor' is still in use today.
As a lot of job names have actually changed, I just wanted to know what word was used for the person who (IN the train) controls/sells the tickets, assists the travellers, ....
Would train assistant be used?

Thanks for your help
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    In BE you have a bus conductor (the person who takes the fares, issues tickets and also helps the driver with tricky traffic manoeuvres) but you never have a train conductor; you have a guard.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Here is a BBC report about an attack on a "conductor" who was working on a train in my region (the region that PaulQ originally came from). In my experience, these conductors issue and check tickets on board the train. I am fairly certain that I have heard the term "train conductor" used in on-train announcements: "Good morning. My name is Gary. I'm your train conductor. Welcome to all passengers joining this train at Long Eaton. Please have your tickets ready for inspection." In the UK, the passenger trains are operated by various private companies and it is possible that some of these use different terms. http://http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/derbyshire/7859220

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/derbyshire/7859220 . I've never heard "train assistant" used in the UK.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Hmmm... is it too obvious that I am not rich enough to go on trains and last went on one 20 years ago? How things have changed. (Long Eaton, eh? almost 'abroad' :D)

    So why this change from 'guards'? Is it marketing?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    On the Long Island Rail Road, which I take every day (and which because of its age -- it was founded in 1834 -- really is spelled that way with "Rail Road" as two words), the person in charge of the train crew is the Conductor. He or she is assisted by a Brakeman (who may be a woman) and one or more Collectors -- but to the average passenger in the seat, they are all wearing the same uniform and are all doing the same job. Thus, a rider would refer to the person in the funny cap who came down the aisle saying "Tickets; all tickets please!" or "Woodside next! Next station Woodside!" as the Conductor.

     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    So why this change from 'guards'? Is it marketing?
    Because the role of a guard is different, and trains no longer have them. On mainline passenger services you now have train managers. The people who work on stopping services are conductors. For examples of the new terminology, you could search for a job here.

    PS I'm talking only about the UK!

    PPS
    is it too obvious that I am not rich enough to go on trains and last went on one 20 years ago?
    Not old enough for your Old Bloke's Railcard yet? It's cheaper for me to make some journeys by rail than to drive.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top