train room number

dhejejjeskms

Senior Member
Korean
Hi, everyone.

I was wondering if each train cabin is named like "room 1" "room2" "room3" and so on in English-speaking countries in the world.
Would you let me know about that?

Thank you very much.
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I don't think we ever have 'rooms' in trains. You might have compartments in carriages/coaches/cars.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It is impossible to give one answer for India, North America, the U.K., and all the other English-speaking countries in the world. If you are interested in a specific country, please tell us which one. (I agree that the word "room" is unlikely to be used in any of them, though "roomette" is sometimes used in North America.)
     

    dhejejjeskms

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It is impossible to give one answer for India, North America, the U.K., and all the other English-speaking countries in the world. If you are interested in a specific country, please tell us which one. (I agree that the word "room" is unlikely to be used in any of them, though "roomette" is sometimes used in North America.)
    Thank you so much, Egmont.
    I would like to know about the U.S. .
     

    dhejejjeskms

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Of the two operators of sleepers in Britain, one uses 'cabin' and the other 'room' in their publicity.
    Thank you so much, Szkot.
    Do you mean there are two kinds of train drivers in England in Britain and one kind of them uses 'cabin' to describe compartments and the other call it 'room' when they publically advertise their train company?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you so much, Szkot.
    Do you mean there are two kinds of train drivers in England in Britain and one kind of them uses 'cabin' to describe compartments and the other call it 'room' when they publically advertise their train company?
    Britain only has three sleeper services, and new carriages are being introduced on two of these. Traditionally it was berths (individual beds) that were numbered, not compartments, but the new trains have numbered rooms, and they are indeed called "rooms" (Caledonian Sleeper trains London to Scotland | Tickets, timetable, fares).

    I don't recall having come across numbered rooms/compartments/cabins on any other train service in Britain or Europe; numbers always apply to seats or berths. The usual term is "compartment".

    Instead of "two kinds of train drivers", I think you mean "two kinds of train" or "two train operators" (or "train operating companies"). Drivers are the people who sit at the front of the train and operate the controls.
     
    Last edited:

    dhejejjeskms

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Britain only has three sleeper services, and new carriages are being introduced on two of these. Traditionally it was berths (individual beds) that were numbered, not compartments, but the new trains have numbered rooms, and they are indeed called "rooms" (Caledonian Sleeper trains London to Scotland | Tickets, timetable, fares).

    I don't recall having come across numbered rooms/compartments/cabins on any other train service in Britain or Europe; numbers always apply to seats or berths. The usual term is "compartment".

    Instead of "two kinds of train drivers", I think you mean "two kinds of train" or "two train operators" (or "train operating companies"). Drivers are the people who sit at the front of the train and operate the controls.
    Thank you so much, Uncle Jack.
     
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