Trainee? Client?

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partypilfix

Member
Russian
Hello! I have a dilemma and I need you to help me to resolve it. I am a personal fitness trainer in a gym that people attend for working out. I instruct and train them. But I also teach them how to eat right and lose weight in order to keep in shape. So I am totally lost. What is it called in English? What are they to me? Students? Clients? Trainees? I get that they're not wards or patients. I am writing a book about losing weight and I opted for "my trainees (achieved results)" but now I am second guessing myself since I've read that it mostly applies to 'a person undergoing training for a particular job or profession'. Please help me out. Big thanks.
 
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  • The pianist

    Senior Member
    English - US
    What is your background? Do you have a degree in kinesiology? Are you a certified kinesiologist? If so, you are a professional and they would be your clients. If you are just an experienced weightlifter or fitness buff who acts as a trainer in a fitness center, then they are your customers. In any case they are not trainees.
     

    The pianist

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Does a barber have customers or clients? For a hairdresser or a home helper to have 'clients' is a little aggrandizing, don't you think?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s certainly normal in the UK for hairdressers to have clients. A customer tends to be someone who buys a product, rather than a service.
     
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