training / trainings || Do a training

  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    All grammar sources say it is incorrect.
    No. If you read them carefully, the sources and their examples are somewhat ambivalent. You can use them as general guidance if you want, but they do not cover all contexts and uses. You have seen the examples in #48.

    I would add that, in any case, "training" can be a participle, gerund, verbal noun, an absolute adjective (which would account for its being uncountable) or common noun.
     
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    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Coming back to training, do you find these correct?

    A: Hi Bob! Where are you heading?
    B: I’m going to a football training session. Sorry, I can’t talk. Don’t want to be late. Bye!
    B: I’m going to football training. Sorry, I can’t talk. Don’t want to be late. Bye!
    B: I’m going to (a) football practice. Sorry, I can’t talk. Don’t want to be late. Bye!

    So is practice there countable or uncountable?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    B are both correct, but B contains two options: one is normal, the other is correct but could only be used in a given context.
    remember that a/an = one example of.

    Practice is rarely countable but that does not mean it is never countable.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    1. So once I remove 'a' in the last one, all three are correct, right?

    2. The dictionary example I gave earlier and have attached here is simply incorrect, right?
     

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    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Dance Etiquette For Beginners | realbuzz.com
    realbuzz.com | Challenge Yourself › ... › Sports & Activities › Dance Etiquette For Begin...
    Errors inevitably happen during dancing and they should not spoil the occasion.

    Sevillanas - Wikipedia
    "Turning during dancing" (picture title)
    These sound wrong to me. But "training" is a noncount verbal noun, so "during training" is fine (unless the context makes it like "during dancing").

    "Training" in "during training" refers to time being spent on training, as "French" in "He was staring out the window during French" refers to time when French was being studied. ("While French" would be an entirely different thing.)
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    And are these two correct? Say two footballers are talking.

    A: Tom, are you coming to training tomorrow?
    B: Sorry, I can't make it. I need to revise for my exams.

    A: Tom, are you coming to practice tomorrow?
    B: Sorry, I can't make it. I need to revise for my exams.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Zaffy, you have misunderstood. The words that end in -ing may either be the present participle of verbs, or nouns in their own right (or indeed adjectives). For example:
    1. I am writing a letter (verb)
    2. I recognise his writing (noun)
    3. He is training to be a singer (verb)
    4. He has an hour's training this evening (noun)

    In case no. 4, it is perfectly correct to use the word during, e.g: He was injured during training (noun).

    [Cross-posted several hours late... :rolleyes:]
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In case no. 4, it is perfectly correct to use the word during, e.g: He was injured during training (noun).
    Ok, why then there is no "the" like, I believe, there should be when we talk about a training session at work?

    -Suddenly, an employee collapsed during the training.
    -Suddenly, a footballer collapsed during training.

    The first example was already posted and someone said 'the' was necessary.
     
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