tratar

nmgadb

Senior Member
English - US
Hi, I haven't been a newbie on a forum for quite some time!

Can someone help me understand how to best use the verb tratar? I am hesitant to use this verb, so maybe some of you can help me better understand it.

Generally when I think of tratar, I think "to treat". Then there are instances like:

"Ese libro se trata de violencia en nuestra juventud" - "se trata de" means "is about".

Should I consider "tratar" and "tratarse de" as two seperate verbs? Is there a relation between the two? Thanks!

-Nathan
 
  • temujin

    Senior Member
    Norway / norwegian
    "tratarse" (reflexsive) = "to be about", as in "este libro se trate de..."
    "tratar", would normally mean "to treat" as in "...Tu novio te trata bien?.."
    But used as a non-reflexive verb it has other meanings as well.
    Try the dictionary.


    good luck
    t.
     

    moira

    Senior Member
    spanish, catalan (Spain)
    tratar.
    (Del lat. tractāre).
    1. tr. Manejar algo y usarlo materialmente.
    2. tr. Manejar, gestionar o disponer algún negocio.
    3. tr. Comunicar, relacionarse con un individuo. U. t. c. intr. y c. prnl. Tratarse con los vecinos.
    4. tr. Tener relaciones amorosas. U. m. c. intr.
    5. tr. Proceder bien, o mal, con una persona, de obra o de palabra.
    6. tr. Cuidar bien, o mal, a alguien, especialmente en orden a la comida, vestido, etc. U. t. c. prnl.
    7. tr. Conferir, discurrir o disputar de palabra o por escrito sobre un asunto. U. t. c. intr. Tratar de algo, sobre algo, acerca de algo.
    8. tr. Dar un título a alguien. Le trató de señoría.
    9. tr. motejar. Le trató de loco.
    10. tr. Aplicar los medios adecuados para curar o aliviar una enfermedad.
    11. tr. Quím. Someter una sustancia a la acción de otra. Tratar agua con azufre.
    12. tr. Tecnol. Someter una sustancia o material a un proceso para purificarlo, analizarlo o darle otras propiedades. Tratar los aceros.
    13. tr. El Salv. insultar (ǁ ofender).
    14. tr. Nic. regañar (ǁ reprender).
    15. intr. Procurar el logro de algún fin. Yo trato de vivir bien.
    16. intr. Comerciar géneros. Tratar en ganado.



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    nmgadb

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I spoke with a native speaker (from peru) about this and she seemed to do more harm than good. She said that "se trata de" is the same as "is about" where se is the verb (ser) and "trata de" is like "acerca de". There is no conjugation of the verb ser that is just se(without accent), correct?

    I am still a little confused...I suppose I just have to consider tratar and se trata de to be two seperate isolate words/phrases whose only correlation is that they have a word involved that is spelled the same (like so many words in english that are spelled the same but have different meanings).
    -Nathan
     

    lilY_

    Member
    Chile Spanish-English
    hey nmgadb!
    I read about your questions and I feel like you are not that sure about the meaning of tratar... in my country we speak of "tratar" when we talk about "trying to do something or how do we treat other people" (you see these are two different meanings)... when we speak about "tratarse de" we are talking about "this is about"....
    Well that's all for now....any question or suggestion please feel free...

    Bye!!!!!!!!!!;)
     

    lilY_

    Member
    Chile Spanish-English
    hey nmgadb!
    I read about your questions and I feel like you are not that sure about the meaning of tratar... in my country we speak of "tratar" when we talk about "trying to do something or how do we treat other people" (you see these are two different meanings)... when we speak about "tratarse de" we are talking about "this is about"....
    Well that's all for now....any question or suggestion please feel free...

    Bye!!!!!!!!!!;)
     

    nmgadb

    Senior Member
    English - US
    lilY_ said:
    hey nmgadb!
    I read about your questions and I feel like you are not that sure about the meaning of tratar... in my country we speak of "tratar" when we talk about "trying to do something or how do we treat other people" (you see these are two different meanings)... when we speak about "tratarse de" we are talking about "this is about"....
    Well that's all for now....any question or suggestion please feel free...

    Bye!!!!!!!!!!;)
    Gracias lily, en el caso "to try to do something" usaria tratar en vez de intentar? Cual es mejor?

    Pienso que entiendo el uso "to treat someone a certain way" como:
    Ella me trata como un nino. Es correcto?

    Gracias por ayudarme, y siente libre corregir mi espanol tambien.

    -Nathan
     

    Sca

    Senior Member
    Argentina Spanish/ English
    Nathan: en ese caso 'tratar' e 'intentar' tienen el mismo significado.
    'Ella me trata...' Si, es correcto.
    De nada, cheers!
     

    Ariadna

    Member
    Español - Spain
    Hello Nmgadb (what a difficult name!:) )
    Here are some examples; I think they are correct both in English and Spanish but if they are not, I will learn something too.


    I tried working in a shop, but I didn't like it
    (Probé a/Traté de trabajar en una tienda, pero no me gustó)

    I tried to phone you, but the line was busy
    (Intenté/Traté de llarmarte, pero la línea estaba ocupada)

    That film seems good; what is it about?
    (Esa película parece buena; de qué trata?)

    It's about a couple that ....
    (Trata de una pareja que....)

    She treats me like if I were a 4-year-old child
    (Me trata como si yo fuera un niño de 4 años)

    Don't treat me like that!
    (No me trates así!)


    I hope they are helpful:)

    Ariadna.
     

    cubaMania

    Senior Member
    nmgadb said:
    I spoke with a native speaker (from peru) about this and she seemed to do more harm than good. She said that "se trata de" is the same as "is about" where se is the verb (ser) and "trata de" is like "acerca de". There is no conjugation of the verb ser that is just se(without accent), correct?
    -Nathan
    Hi Nathan,

    I want to make sure you are clear that the 'se' in 'tratarse de' has nothing whatever to do with the verb 'ser'. It (the 'se' part) is some sort of pronoun thingy. It's all terribly complicated and you'd probably have to study stuff like 'verbos prenominales' and 'verbos reflexivos' to get a handle on this. Or alternatively, there are some very knowledgeable experts in this forum who might make it easier for you by explaining the specific grammar to you if they happen to catch this thread and you happen to catch their interest. In the meantime, here's my small contribution:

    tratar de (verb) = to try to (do something)
    tratar de (algo) = to be about (something), to have to do with (something)
    and yes I think the same thing can be said as traterse de (algo)
    tratar con (alguien) = to deal with (somebody), to negotiate with (somebody)

    Why they sometimes attach the pronoun form to the verb and sometimes not is a mystery, and even appears sometimes to be optional, i.e. you can say the same thing either with or without the 'se.' Or at least it appears so to me. Here's hoping an expert in Spanish grammar will turn up and straighten us out on this. I'm very interested myself.
     

    Antartic

    Senior Member
    Chile
    En el caso de:
    tratar de (algo) = to be about (something), to have to do with (something)
    Algunos verbos llevan o no llevan se, sin cambiar el significado. Ocurre a veces que en España usan el verbo con la forma se y en mi pais se usa sin el se, por una cuestion de uso y costumbre, por ello en tu ejemplo, estas dos oraciones son equivalentes:

    "Ese libro se trata de la violencia en nuestra juventud"
    "Ese libro trata de la violencia en nuestra juventud"
     

    lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    Since this inquiry deals with verb nuances and usage, I will transfer this thread to the Grammar/Gramática forum.

    Saludos,
    LN
     

    cristóbal

    Senior Member
    EEUU/Inglés
    Something important to realize, that ought to help in understanding why "tratarse de" and "tratar de" mean "to be about", is that the verb treat in English can also have this meaning. For example, take a look at the English noun "treatise" (tratado en español) which is a written document which 'treats' a certain subject.
    Simply because English commonly migrates toward verb compositions including the verb "to be", this usage of the verb "to treat" has fallen out of use.
    However, the American Heritage dictionary provides a very clear definition: "To deal with a subject or topic in writing or speech. Often used with of: The essay treats of courtly love."

    In other words, "tratar" and "tratarse de" are not two different verbs, but are two different uses of the same verb. "to treat of" is the literal meaning of "tratarse de"... El ensayo se trata del amor galante. It always helps to brush up on one's English when learning another language. ;) :)
     

    cubaMania

    Senior Member
    Muchas gracias, Antartic. Aprendo tanto gracias á la ayuda de los amables foreros. Así es como yo lo he observado. A veces lo oigo con 'se' y a veces lo oigo sin 'se' y tiene el mismo sentido.

    Thank you cristóbal. We learn so much in this forum. Or looked at another way, I chip away at my ignorance, bit by bit. It is interesting that tratar and treat actually do share the 'to be about' meaning, but I do not see that this involves the pronoun form 'se' because (as Antartic confirmed) either 'tratar de' or 'tratarse de' can be used to mean 'to be about.'

    e.g. "El ensayo se trata del amor galante." can also be said as "El ensayo trata del amor galante." and both can be reflected by the English use of "to treat of" irrespective of the use of the pronoun form 'se.'

    It's a pesky problem that little bit of pronoun 'se' but I'm gradually starting to get it.
     

    nmgadb

    Senior Member
    English - US
    cristóbal said:
    Something important to realize, that ought to help in understanding why "tratarse de" and "tratar de" mean "to be about", is that the verb treat in English can also have this meaning. For example, take a look at the English noun "treatise" (tratado en español) which is a written document which 'treats' a certain subject.
    Simply because English commonly migrates toward verb compositions including the verb "to be", this usage of the verb "to treat" has fallen out of use.
    However, the American Heritage dictionary provides a very clear definition: "To deal with a subject or topic in writing or speech. Often used with of: The essay treats of courtly love."

    In other words, "tratar" and "tratarse de" are not two different verbs, but are two different uses of the same verb. "to treat of" is the literal meaning of "tratarse de"... El ensayo se trata del amor galante. It always helps to brush up on one's English when learning another language. ;) :)
    Wahoo! Something clicked after reading your reply! I have learned so much about the crazy english language that I grew up speaking since I've ventured to learn spanish.
    Te agradezco tanto! Pensaba que el verbo tratar necesitaba relacionar con tratar(se) de. Muchissimas gracias, ojala que tenga la oportunidad para devolver el favor. Gracias a todos los que han respondido.
    -Nathan
     

    asm

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish
    En este foro tratamos de ayudarnos unos a otros, de eso se trata.

    No confundir con el tratamiento de aguas (nosotros tratamos el agua de consumo domestico).

    To me tratar is to attempt (with effort) or to deal with (people).

    Tratan duro (they try hard)
    Me tratan duro (they are hard/mean with me)

    I hope this helps.

    Al menos traté

    ASM


    nmgadb said:
    Hi, I haven't been a newbie on a forum for quite some time!

    Can someone help me understand how to best use the verb tratar? I am hesitant to use this verb, so maybe some of you can help me better understand it.

    Generally when I think of tratar, I think "to treat". Then there are instances like:

    "Ese libro se trata de violencia en nuestra juventud" - "se trata de" means "is about".

    Should I consider "tratar" and "tratarse de" as two seperate verbs? Is there a relation between the two? Thanks!

    -Nathan
     

    nmgadb

    Senior Member
    English - US
    asm said:
    En este foro tratamos de ayudarnos unos a otros, de eso se trata.

    No confundir con el tratamiento de aguas (nosotros tratamos el agua de consumo domestico).

    To me tratar is to attempt (with effort) or to deal with (people).

    Tratan duro (they try hard)
    Me tratan duro (they are hard/mean with me)

    I hope this helps.

    Al menos traté

    ASM
    Se puede decir "En este foro intentamos de ayudarnos unos a otros..."en vez de tratamos?
     

    asm

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish
    Sí se puede, el significado es ligeramente distinto, ya que "tratar" implica un esfuerzo, intentar es un poco mas neutro. En general si son sinonimos.
    En mi participacion yo solo TRATABA de dar ejemplos.


    nmgadb said:
    Se puede decir "En este foro intentamos de ayudarnos unos a otros..."en vez de tratamos?
     

    everything

    Member
    UK- london - english
    Ariadna said:
    Hello Nmgadb (what a difficult name!:) )
    Here are some examples; I think they are correct both in English and Spanish but if they are not, I will learn something too.


    I tried working in a shop, but I didn't like it
    (Probé a/Traté de trabajar en una tienda, pero no me gustó)

    I tried to phone you, but the line was busy
    (Intenté/Traté de llarmarte, pero la línea estaba ocupada)

    That film seems good; what is it about?
    (Esa película parece buena; de qué trata?)

    It's about a couple that ....
    (Trata de una pareja que....)

    She treats me like if I were a 4-year-old child
    (Me trata como si yo fuera un niño de 4 años)

    Don't treat me like that!
    (No me trates así!)


    I hope they are helpful:)

    Ariadna.
    you're english is extremely good, its just that one sentence which should be "She treats me as if I were a 4-year old (child)"

    by the way, it is more likely that someone would say "She treats me like a 4-year-old" or "She treats me like I'm four years old"

    but yeah, ur english is v.good, i wish my spanish was at a similar level.:)
     
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