travailler en binôme

Rosary

New Member
English, England
Est-ce qu'on peut utiliser le mot "binôme" pour une personne (par exemple, pour un époux)?
Merci.
 
  • Punky Zoé

    Senior Member
    Pau
    France - français
    For two people, yes. But we sometimes say il est mon binôme...

    And according to my dictionary, definitely yes. It was used in school slang.
     

    wadlurik

    New Member
    Francais
    How can I translate "je travaille en binôme avec lui"?
    Him and I work together?
    Or is there something more appropriate?

    Many thanks
     

    Markus

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    I'd say we work in pairs. Admittedly this sounds a bit strange since we're only talking about one pair, but I can't think of a better way to put it. Maybe someone else can improve on what I've said!
     

    Markus

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    The problem with we work together and we work in a team is that the precision of binôme is lost, because we don't know how many people there are in the group.
     

    Lora44

    Senior Member
    England, English
    The two of us work together?
    We work in a pair? (Ok, yes I prefer the suggestion 'We work as a pair' - it's 'work in pairs, work as a pair')

    We pair up and work together?

    I'm just thinking out loud...
     

    Markus

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    I think that works well. The 'as a team' acts as emphasis/clarification so you could probably even get away with 'the two of us work together'.
    You could get away with this when speaking, by putting the emphasis on the word together. If you put the emphasis on the word work, it could just mean that you work for the same company. And of course in writing it is ambiguous. :)
     

    wadlurik

    New Member
    Francais
    Oh my god that were pretty quick and efficient answerS!!!!

    Thanks a lot everybody!!!

    "We work as a pair" sounds as concise as the "nous travaillons en binôme"

    Perhaps the "the two of us work together, as a team" is more accurate…



    Thanks again!
     

    Newangle

    Senior Member
    English, France
    I was looking for confirmation for my idea for a similar phrase, "we work (or operate) as a two-man team". No one came up with that originally, but someone might like it in the future!
     

    Saffron

    Member
    English - United States
    Depends on the context, but this could be rendered as: two people working alternate shifts

    In the context I am looking at, two employees appear to work half-time on opposite shifts. This is a means of lowering the company's payroll expenses without terminating either employee entirely.

    de la mise en place des congés à temps partiel à 50% en binôme
    setting up half-time leave by two people working alternate shifts

    In the previous comments above, I feel that "working as teams" is too vague a translation for bînome. A team could be 2 people or 20 people. Pairs is better. Termium suggested (in a military context): buddy system where two combattants have similar skills. One does the job, while the other provides covering protection.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    In the previous comments above, I feel that "working as teams" is too vague a translation for bînome.
    That exists in the US under the term job-sharing. It has often been organized for people with small children at home who want to keep working but not full-time. They work out an arrangement to cover a full-time job together. They job-share

    Otherwise if you are just describing two people who are a team (like policemen who both ride all day in the same car), we call them partners.

    In a humorous vein, you sometimes will hear people call two people working very well together the dynamic duo (like Batman and Robin)!
     

    ethibaul

    New Member
    French
    Hi, in a resume, I would like to underline the fact that I was working as a team, together with the responsible of...

    I don't find the appropriate sentence :
    - Worked as a pair with the responsible of...
    - Worked in a team of two with... (with this form, I think it's not clear that I was one of these two people and not assisting a team of two person and I think that it implies that the team was only composed of two people, which was not the case)
    - any other suggestions...

    Many thanks for your help.
     
    Last edited:

    Schmorgluck

    Senior Member
    French - France
    I feel the urge to expand a little on this notion of "binôme". I fist met it when I started to study at the faculté de sciences (universitary studies). Since the word comes from mathematics (it's French for binomial), I've always assumed its use to designate (initially) a pair of students assigned to work together, originated in the academics. According to the TLFI, I was right. It apparently originated, more specifically, in the Grandes Écoles. It have since extended to other fields.

    Also of note, by extension (I think through some kind of metonymy), it can designate a member of such a team from the perspective of the other. Let's say Alice and Bob work as a binôme: Alice can call Bob her binôme. Caroline, who speaks of Bob to Daniel, who only knows Alice, can say he's Alice's binôme.
     

    LMorland

    Senior Member
    American English
    Fascinating linguistic story -- I love it! :)

    It makes for a knotty translation problem, however. For example, I'm in the process of translating the (verbless) sentence:

    Un binôme créatif très complémentaire.

    The context is a publicity flyer for a restaurant that has a husband-and-wife team as chef and pastry chef. Of course, since in English 'binomials' are still restricted to mathematics, I'm translating bînome by pair, but I've had to completely rearrange the sentence to arrive at a harmonious effect.
     

    Aline Si

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi,

    I'd like to say in english "Travailler chaque jour avec un binôme différent".

    How can I adapt the "work in pairs" ?

    My suggestion : "Work with a different pair each day".
    Does it work ?
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello,
    "with a different pair" would mean me + 2 people (the pair) who change.
    It would use "in a different pair" (me + 1 person who is defferent every day).
    (I think "as a different pair" would mean both members change or even imply "as if we were two different people from who we were yesterday").
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    Hello,
    "with a different pair" would mean me + 2 people (the pair) who change.
    It would use "in a different pair" (me + 1 person who is defferent every day).
    (I think "as a different pair" would mean both members change or even imply "as if we were two different people from who we were yesterday").
    I think a more natural way to say this in English would be Each day, different people pair up to work together.

     

    sweesa01

    New Member
    English - US
    I know this forum has been pretty exhausted, but another possibility is "work in tandem", it has a nice ring to it.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I like work in tandem.

    I've just come across the term binômé (note the accent) which refers not to the people but the 3rd-year engineering project that they're working on - Projet binomé, bibliographique. I'm proposing Bibliographical project, working in pairs unless anyone can think of a better.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top