travel long-distance abroad

Peter SLP

Senior Member
Polish
Hi all,

I am not sure if this expression is correct "to travel long distance abroad"


"It is the first time within the last few years that I haven’t travelled long distance abroad"

I meant that I used to travel far away from my country but in this case it was an exception.

 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    We don’t use “long distance” in that way. For one thing, to those of us over 50, at least, “long distance” is specific to phone calls (or how phone calls used to work).

    We would need some context in order to be able to say whether the rest of your sentence makes sense. What are you trying to say?
     

    Peter SLP

    Senior Member
    Polish
    We don’t use “long distance” in that way. For one thing, to those of us over 50, at least, “long distance” is specific to phone calls (or how phone calls used to work).

    We would need some context in order to be able to say whether the rest of your sentence makes sense. What are you trying to say?
    I wanted to say that I haven't travelled far and abroad at the same time.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    "I haven't made any long trips abroad", perhaps, on the assumption that a long trip is likely to be to a place a long way from home. Otherwise it will have to be more wordy.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    In your sentence, you need to distinguish between:

    ---- long distances because of the country visited is far away from your own country;
    Eg: I travelled a long distance to reach the small island of Malta.
    --- long distance journeys after you have travelled to the other country.
    Eg: It's a short journey from my country to Russia, but once there I travelled long distances, visiting Novo Sibirsk, Vladivostok, and Sochi by train.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    And keep in mind, that "far/long" is relative. For me, just "abroad" starts at 700km (The distance from here to the nearest city in Mexico).
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I wanted to say that I haven't travelled far and abroad at the same time.
    That statement can have two meanings. Which do you mean?

    1. I haven't travelled far, and I haven't travelled abroad.

    2. I haven't travelled for long distances abroad.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In AE we say "travelled long distances abroad". That fits your sentence.

    But the example sentence has another problem: what does "first time" mean? To understand, look at these two sentences which mean the same thing:

    It is the first time within the last few years that I haven’t travelled long distances abroad.
    Every other time, during the last few years, I have travelled long distances abroad.

    What does "every other time" mean? Every week? Every year? Every trip? Every something else?
     

    Peter SLP

    Senior Member
    Polish
    In AE we say "travelled long distances abroad". That fits your sentence.

    But the example sentence has another problem: what does "first time" mean? To understand, look at these two sentences which mean the same thing:

    It is the first time within the last few years that I haven’t travelled long distances abroad.
    Every other time, during the last few years, I have travelled long distances abroad.

    What does "every other time" mean? Every week? Every year? Every trip? Every something else?
    Many thanks! It is about trips that happen every year.
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    If I want to say that I don't like traveling that takes a long time. Which of the sentences are acceptable? Thanks.

    I don't like traveling long.
    I don't like traveling for a long time.
    I don't like traveling long distances.
    I don't like taking a long trip/ journey.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If I want to say that I don't like traveling that takes a long time. Which of the sentences are acceptable? Thanks.

    I don't like traveling long. :cross:
    I don't like traveling for a long time. :cross:
    I don't like traveling long distances. :thumbsup::confused:
    I don't like taking a long trips/ journey. :tick:
    The first is not grammatically correct.
    The second isn't really either, and "for a long time" could refer to how long you've disliked it. I haven't liked traveling for a long time.
    There may be a context in which "I don't like traveling long distances." would be good but it seems unusual on its own.
    I don't like taking long trips. is the best.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, it would be wrong. Even if you meant a particular trip, the indefinite article would not really work in that statement.
     
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