treaching (on)--treaching on the DUP

bennymix

Senior Member
It had all started so well, too. He had actually managed to win a meaningful vote on his Brexit deal. Which was more than Theresa May had ever done. It had meant treaching on the DUP and fooling a few Labour MPs who were desperate to be fooled, but needs must.
{Today's Guardian: Boris Johnson said he'd die in a ditch but his Brexit timetable is dead from a glitch }
---
I haven't seen this word. Is it one-off coinage? Is it BE? I suppose it means committing an act of treachery, but have seen the verb.
 
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  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    It's a new one on me. It could be the author's own coinage, unless it's some new street-slang that I haven't yet come across.

    Where's the quote from, please - that might give us a clue?
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Crace on Boris: {Source in the OP}
    Boris Johnson said he'd die in a ditch but his Brexit timetable is dead from a glitch

    More context:

    It’s often hard to know which is the more scary. The Boris Johnson in full-blown narcissistic meltdown, lost to himself and any contact with reality. Or the Boris that is giving his best impression of empathy: trying to pretend he is aware that other people actually exist. The first is terrifying but has the virtue of a certain integrity: a menace operating in plain sight.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Crace appears to be using "treach" as a verb meaning to commit an act of treachery. Since treachery is a stronger term than betrayal, this might well account for Crace coining a new word rather than using "betraying"; also it allows him to include the preposition "on", perhaps bringing to mind such expressions as "shit on".

    I suspect it was coined by Crace, although it might be in limited use in some circles. I have not come across the term before.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I haven't heard it before either, but it has an air of 'posh schoolboy slang' about it. I imagine that's the impression Crace was seeking, whether he coined the term or not.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I haven't heard it before either, but it has an air of 'posh schoolboy slang' about it. I imagine that's the impression Crace was seeking, whether he coined the term or not.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: I'm surprised you didn't pick up on that, Benny, you with your newfound expertise in Johnsonese;)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It doesn't pop up on the internet, except as a verb meaning to be shot in the backside to revitalise a career as a rapper.

    It seems a shame that a writer who is supposed to be a highly literate and skilled Parliamentary sketch writer cannot manage to find a suitable existing word or phrase in a language that is so rich in near synonyms.
     
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