treat (her) AS or treat (her) LIKE a diva!

  • kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hello. If I remember my English grammar correctly it should be: treat as...(as in, treat her as if she were a diva) but in everyday colloquial English you always hear: treat her like...
     

    ManPaisa

    Banned
    AmE (New England) / español (Colombia)
    Hello. If I remember my English grammar correctly it should be: treat as...(as in, treat her as if she were a diva) but in everyday colloquial English you always hear: treat her like...
    If I remember correctly, there's no problem with using like as a preposition. The controversy comes up when people use it as a conjunction.

    Treat her like a diva :tick:
    Treat her like I would a diva :warning:
    Treat her as I would a diva :tick:

    Let's wait for other opinions.
     

    LeBarron

    New Member
    English - United States
    Diva has a quite specialised meaning (see WR Dictionary), so you would only treat her as or like a diva if she were a celebrated opera singer.

    In the absence of further context, I would prefer 'treat your wife like a princess' (make her feel special).

    Rover
    I would agree with this. Diva can also have negative connotations and be taken as an insult, so be careful. In the context of a husband or wife, treating her like a princess/queen/royalty would probably be better.
     

    lgr632525968

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Sorry, I am still confused.

    I treat my dog like my sister.
    I treat my dog as my sisrer.

    Which one is correct?
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I treat my wife like a diva - that would suggest that you treated her as if she were a diva.

    I treat my wife as a diva
    (does)- that would suggest that you treated her as a diva would treat her.

    Needless to say in ordinary speech the meanings overlap.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I treat my dog like my sister.
    I treat my dog as my sister.
    If forced to create a difference, I would say the difference is something like this:
    1) I treat my dog in the same manner as I treat my sister. I am as kind (or mean) to my dog as I am to my sister.
    2) I treat my dog as if my dog really is my sister. When my parents die, I plan to give my dog a share of the inheritance. ;)
    In most situations, they usually are used to mean the same thing.
     

    lgr632525968

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I'm sorry. I wasn't making myself clear.

    I mean, I love my dog very much so I treat her very well. In fact, I think of her as my little sister.

    In this case, do those two sentences have the same meaning?

    Thank you.
     

    memorable

    Member
    Turkish
    When the examples with "as" and "like" are used, a turmoil appears if the focused idea is act and person. "As if" expresses the meaning very well like in AmaryllisBunny's example. However as I understand if we don't use "as if" the meaning will confuse. Thomas Tompion and Myridon say different things. Am I right??
    (Please always correct my faults and misunderstandings)
     

    AmaryllisBunny

    Senior Member
    Both Thomas Tompion and Myridon state, "Needless to say in ordinary speech the meanings overlap." and "In most situations, they usually are used to mean the same thing." respectively. Although their analysis differ in prescriptive meaning of "as" vs "like," in general there is little/no confusion unless the sentence is ambiguous, or the reader insists on prescriptivism.

    I completely agree with ManPaisa's statement: "If I remember correctly, there's no problem with using like as a preposition. The controversy comes up when people use it as a conjunction." There has been an aversion/fear towards/of the use of "like" even when it is quite appropriate.

    If your sentence is ambiguous in a descriptive sense, it may need revision, but if the only ambiguity lies in a prescriptive sense, I don't see what 'all the fuss is about.'


    "I treat my dog like a sister;" this is my preference over, "I treat my dog as I would a sister."
     
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