treated with appropriate guidance

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
The phrase "appropriate guidance" is impressive. But can it be simply expressed as "proer guidance" with unreduced formality?

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Despite these concerns, all four patients who were seen in Munich have had mild cases and were hospitalized primarily for public health purposes. Since hospital capacities are limited — in particular, given the concurrent peak of the influenza season in the northern hemisphere — research is needed to determine whether such patients can be treated with appropriate guidance and oversight outside the hospital.

Source: New England Journal of Medicine January 30, 2020
2019-nCoV Transmission from Asymptomatic PatientC. Rothe and Others
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The phrase "appropriate guidance" is impressive. But can it be simply expressed as "proer guidance" with unreduced formality?
    Appropriate is unremarkable and not particularly formal here. It is not "impressive" in the slightest.
    adj. particularly suitable; fitting; correct :appropriate behavior.[be + ~ + to]remarks appropriate to the occasion
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I don't think that it is at all simpler to use "proper". "Proper" is rather vague. "Appropriate", in this context, means appropriate to the patient and the stage of their illness; to the accommodation, and to the skills and ability of the person dealing with the patient. "Appropriate" is simple and far better.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Thank you.

    I don't think that it is at all simpler to use "proper". "Proper" is rather vague. "Appropriate", in this context, means appropriate to the patient and the stage of their illness; to the accommodation, and to the skills and ability of the person dealing with the patient. "Appropriate" is simple and far better.
    "Proper" is defined as "right, appropriate or correct." So I don't understand why you would have had so strong a negative opinion on it.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Proper" is defined as "right, appropriate or correct." So I don't understand why you would have had so strong a negative opinion on it.
    There is overlap in possible meanings between the two words, but this site was set up, among other things, to help address nuances that native speakers can help with that are not included in dictionaries. Proper does not carry the connotation of "particularly suitable to the individual" as Paul explained, the way appropriate does.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I don't understand why you would have had so strong a negative opinion on it.
    I don't have a negative view of "proper" but, like other a native speakers, I have a sense of the nuances involved between the words "proper" and "appropriate." Appropriate is appropriate; proper would not be proper.

    Appropriate takes into consideration the context and circumstances. "Proper" imposes some unstated (in this case) standard.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    First, I think there should be commas there.

    research is needed to determine whether such patients can be treated, with appropriate guidance and oversight, outside the hospital.

    They are treated outside, not treated with a substance called guidance.

    "Proper" imposes some unstated (in this case) standard.
    I agree. Proper has a more "ethical" nuance, where appropriate has a more practical one.

    Can they be treated outside the hospital by people with potentially limited training with the help of some practical, third party advice when needed?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    To put it another way, as a tomato is a fruit, it would be proper (technically) to put it in a fruit salad, however, it would not be appropriate as the result would be horrible.
     
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