Trench

NickJunior

Senior Member
Khmer
In the Trench (19,800 feet and deeper), there are vents; and up through these vents that the hot waters spout warm up the giant clams and tube worms. The clams and worms have enough things to eat because this deep spot has unusual heat.
What is meant by "have enough things to eat" in the last sentence in the quote above. Does it mean that the clams and the worms eat hot mud for food? Thanks.
 
  • NickJunior

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    No, but the heat allows other living organisms to survive there. These make up the food source of the clams and worms.
    Hi Bibliolept. I always appreciate your reply. I just want to understand you correctly. So you said that "the heat allows other living things to survive.."? I've always thought that the heat will kill instead of encouraging life. Please enlighten me. Thanks.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    This is more of a research question, but don't forget that at great depths the temperatures are very, very low. Thus, the vents act as oases of heat, allowing a greater density of life or at least different life than that which survives in other parts of the ocean at similar depths.
     

    NickJunior

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Bibliolept, I make the connection now, especially when you mentioned the low temperatures at great depths. Trisia, where have you been? Very happy to see you again. Thanks for the reply. You are thoughtful as ever.
     
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