Trenino cittadino

Florianap

Senior Member
Italy, Italian
Ciao!

Qualcuno sa dirmi come si dice in inglese "trenino cittadino", cioé quei trenini usati per gli spostamenti in città?

Grazieeee
 
  • MGT747

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    If I'm understanding correctly, in Washington DC, we call it the Metro. In New York, it's called the subway.
     

    MStraf

    Senior Member
    If I'm understanding correctly, in Washington DC, we call it the Metro. In New York, it's called the subway.
    And in San Francisco is called BART :) and none of them are "light rail" systems, that are much slower and lighter (one or two cars) and run mostly on street. It is very similar to the streetcar, but often it runs on its own road and is therefore faster.
     

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    What's called in English the "trenino" you may find eg. in parks or in other tourist resorts? I think this is what the OP was asking for but I'm not sure the question has been properly answered so far.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    It depends on the context. As a local person who is not going to be seen dead riding around town in that train, you'd call it a tourist train. If you're trying to sell people tickets to go on it, then as a ticket seller you would call it a sightseeing train :D
     

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Sorry about the broken link and thanks you all for the answers. When we say "trenino" in Italian it's clear that we're speaking of a "treno gommato" (with tyres). Does "tourist train" convey the same idea?
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    Is it important that it be immediately obvious that it's got wheels? What's your particular context? (There is no short and snappy way of conveying this "road-based on wheels" element in English.)
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    Ok, it sounds to me as though the fact that it's on wheels is immaterial.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    🇬🇧 English (England)
    I don’t think we’d usually attach an adjective to it: ‘trackless’ would be a rather technical, whereas I think in English we’d usually just call it a ‘train’, in a context where it’s clear that it isn’t a real train on rails.
    It depends on the context.
    :thumbsup:
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I don’t think we’d usually attach an adjective to it: ‘trackless’ would be a rather technical, whereas I think in English we’d usually just call it a ‘train’, in a context where it’s clear that it isn’t a real train on rails.:thumbsup:
    This is a trackless train:

    giphy.gif


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