triggerearse

Parlanchina

Senior Member
English, USA
I just came across the following comment on a Facebook post:

que por cierto no entiendo por qué se triggerean por eso como si fuera tan importante

Observations:
1) This is the first time I have seen the word "triggerearse".
2) This is also the first time I have seen the double g in a loanword in Spanish. Perhaps this was a way to emphasize that it was being pronounced with the hard g (as in English) rather than the fricative sound the g would normally make before an e?
3) What a fascinating loanword!

Has anyone else seen this? Is there another way to express "trigger" in Spanish?
 
  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    "To be triggered" is a new concept in US society. It refers to people having psychological "triggers" -- stimulus that causes a (usually negative) response. For example, if I nearly drowned when I was a child, any discussion or images regarding a drowning might be triggers for me, they might trigger negative emotions. My guess is that trigger-earse is a hispanification of this concept.

    However, @Parlanchina, it would be helpful if you could give us more information than "on a Facebook post". Who is the subject of the sentence? What is the post about?
     

    Magazine

    Senior Member
    Español-España.
    "To be triggered" is a new concept in US society. It refers to people having psychological "triggers"
    Yes, I am familiar with trigger...but triggerearse...jesus, that's awful . :rolleyes:

    However, @Parlanchina, it would be helpful if you could give us more information than "on a Facebook post". Who is the subject of the sentence? What is the post about?
    Yes, that would indeed be very helpful, this "new" word is completely unknown to me. (I would like to think here in Spain).
    3) What a fascinating loanword!
    I am sorry, but I couldn't agree less. We have like a dozen words which mean trigger in Spanish, so no need to use an English "adaptation".
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    It's the first time that I see it but a search online showed many examples of use; not just in the Americas but in Spain too. Anyway, it shouldn't be room for such a word if people cared about Spanish but there's too much people that don't care.
     
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