trite/cliche/banal

handlez

Member
chinese
H,there.
My question is are they the same or different?
Which one is used most frequently in daily talk?
 
  • handlez

    Member
    chinese
    Thank you for answering me so quickly,I've a follow-up question. Can I say "this line is a bit of Cliche?"In this scenario,is cliche being used as an adjective?
     

    DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    is cliche being used as an adjective?
    No, if it's a bit of "something" then that something has to be a noun. The adjectival form is "clichéd", e.g. "The candidate's trite and banal speech was full of clichéd expressions."
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    As for meaning, 'trite' means 'well worn' or 'overused', 'banal' means 'commonplace', 'unimportant', 'uninteresting'.
    A cliché may be trite (well worn) without being banal (unimportant).
     
    Last edited:

    Charwalk

    Senior Member
    All of them are synonyms. Synonyms are words with similar meaning and not the same meaning. There may be a slight difference in the meaning. Some people are completely lacking in originality and imagination - and their talk shows it. Everything they say is trite, hackneyed, commonplace and humorless - their speech patterns are full of cliches and stereotypes, their phraseology is without sparkle. The term 'banal' is used for their speech. 'Cliche' is a Frech word that originally means "an eletrotype or stereotype plate for printing. Therefore a statement that is stereotype, fixed and lacking originality is called a cliche. "you speak in cliches" is the most devastating way of criticising the speaker.
     
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