truly concede defeat

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hly2004

Banned
chinese
Hi, everyone:

The football team defeats its rival team with 1:0.
Its opponent concede the game only verbally.
Its opponent believes it attributes their defeat to bad luck.

The football team defeats its rival team with 5:0.
Its opponent ______________(both verbally and whole-heartedly)

My question is how to express the idea.

Best wishes
 
  • Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    Hi, everyone:

    The football team defeats its rival team with 1:0.
    Its opponent concede the game only verbally.
    Its opponent believes it attributes their defeat to bad luck.

    The football team defeats its rival team with 5:0.
    Its opponent ______________(both verbally and whole-heartedly)

    My question is how to express the idea.

    Best wishes
    Sorry, but I don't understand what you are trying to ask. (see ???)

    A football team defeats its rival: 1:0.
    Their opponent concedes the game only verbally. ???
    Their opponent believes the defeat is solely due to bad luck.

    A football team defeats its rival: 5:0.
    Their opponent ______________ (both verbally and whole-heartedly) ???
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I'm with Joobs. I'm not quite sure what you're going for here. I'll take a stab at it.

    I think the first condition would be to "grudgingly admit/concede defeat." The second condition would be to "wholeheartedly admit/concede defeat", to borrow a word from Joobs.
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Hi, everyone:

    In my language, there's a set phrase which expresses the second idea
    (You agree the fact that you're defeated from both your mouth and heart )


    The first one is "They concede in a way that shows they are not convinced.Although they may (1)say they accept the result.do not (2)truly think they are any weaker".
    The second one is "They really think the other team is much stronger than them and say it"
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Well, in essence, "concede" doesn't have a lot of heartfelt emotion in it unless it's modified with an adverb. :) "They conceded defeat", by itself, gives the impression that the other team won but that the losing team does not want any conclusions to be drawn from the loss. It closely matches your first definition.

    If you said, "The other team bested us" it would mean both that they won and that they were better overall players, at least in that game. That's my impression, anyway. That's the only set phrase that comes to mind that says both that you were defeated and that it was a matter of the other team playing better than your team.
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Thank you, JamesM.

    I looked it up, and it appears to be old-fashioned.
    I prefer this one:
    wholeheartedly admit/concede defeat (heart)
    But it does not include the sense of "mouth"

    I think there are voids in both two languages against each other.
    Now, I wonder how to say it in a way that is natural to native speakers(the idea of "full acknowledge of defeat","heart", "mouth",).

    Best wishes
     

    Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    If you said, "The other team bested us" it would mean both that they won and that they were better overall players, at least in that game. That's my impression, anyway. That's the only set phrase that comes to mind that says both that you were defeated and that it was a matter of the other team playing better than your team.
    "trounced" (to defeat decisively) is another.

    Hey, there's a football review game on the TV at the moment maybe I'll get some tips from the (semi-literate) pundits. :)

    Yep, they came through with "walked all over us"

    You could use these as:

    Their opponent's acknowleged (mouth) they had been sorely (heart?) trounced.
    Their opponent's admitted (mouth) the resounding (body and soul?) defeat with the comment : "they walked all over us" (mouth - again)
     
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