trump right and wrong

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jooney

Senior Member
Korean
Hi,

If that sounds outrageous, it's because his high scores and his client's money trumped right and wrong. At the height of his business, Eshaghoff was able to charge as much as $2,500 per test.

What does the underlined part mean? There is no such phrase in the dictionaries.

I' appreciate your help.


 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "To trump X" means, per the WR dictionary, "to surpass X by doing something better." The term comes from card games, in which a low card from a trump suit (for example, the three of clubs, if clubs is the trump suit) can beat a higher card from a non-trump suit (such as the king of hearts).

    Here, apparently, a combination of high test scores and money were more important, in some situation that the given context does not describe, than "right and wrong:" what is the right thing to do.

    Please tell us where this is from, by the way. Aside from that being a forum rule, and aside from fairness (right and wrong) requiring people to always state the source of quoted material, it helps understand what words mean.
     

    jooney

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you very much, Egmont. I'm sorry that I forgot to give the source. It's from a video on cheating on the SATs. It's about a story of Sam Eshaghoff who took the SAT for others.
     
    "right and wrong" is being used here to mean "any further consideration of whether what he was doing was right, or whether it was wrong"; in other words "any consideration of the morality of his actions."
     
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