Trusted insider.

hack3rcon

Senior Member
Russian
Hello.
I'm reading MafiaBoy book from Michael Calce and I want to know what does "trusted insider" mean? Can it mean "Self Confidence" ?
"Schiefer represented the nightmare scenario of a trusted insider who uses his knowledge for criminal purposes"
For more information Please see "Mafiaboy".

Thank you.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    An "insider" is an employee, working "inside" a company, who knows a lot of the company's private information: information the public does not know. A "trusted insider" is an employee that the company trusts.

    His "knowledge" is secret information of the company. It could be many different things, including bank account numbers, sales strategies or other things. He could sell their secrets to another company, or use his knowledge to embezzle money from the company, etc.
     

    hack3rcon

    Senior Member
    Russian
    An "insider" is an employee, working "inside" a company, who knows a lot of the company's private information: information the public does not know. A "trusted insider" is an employee that the company trusts.

    His "knowledge" is secret information of the company. It could be many different things, including bank account numbers, sales strategies or other things. He could sell their secrets to another company, or use his knowledge to embezzle money from the company, etc.
    Really?
    Thus, "Schiefer shown the worst thing that an employee which have access to the sensitive information at a company can doing" ?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    There is no "worst thing" in the original sentence. There is only a "nightmare scenario": a scary possible event. For a businessman running a company, this possible event is scary: "a trusted employee mis-uses secret company information to commit crimes". The possible damage to the company is unlimited: this event could even destroy the company.

    The sentence doesn't tell me who Schiefer is, or how he relates to this scenario. From their use of the word "represent", my best guess is that Schiefer is "a trusted insider at a company, who has mis-used his knowledge for criminal purposes".
     

    hack3rcon

    Senior Member
    Russian
    There is no "worst thing" in the original sentence. There is only a "nightmare scenario": a scary possible event. For a businessman running a company, this possible event is scary: "a trusted employee mis-uses secret company information to commit crimes". The possible damage to the company is unlimited: this event could even destroy the company.

    The sentence doesn't tell me who Schiefer is, or how he relates to this scenario. From their use of the word "represent", my best guess is that Schiefer is "a trusted insider at a company, who has mis-used his knowledge for criminal purposes".
    Schiefer is not an employee and nightmare scenario mean " If you describe a situation or event as a nightmare scenario, you mean that it is the worst possible thing that could happen".
    Then Schiefer is no an employee then what does it mean?
     

    AutumnOwl

    Senior Member
    -
    Swedish
    An insider doesn't have to be an employee, it can as well be a consultant, like John Schiefer was, working during the day to help companies to secure their networks, and being a hacker at night. He knew all the security glitches in the company network that he had worked with.
     

    hack3rcon

    Senior Member
    Russian
    An insider doesn't have to be an employee, it can as well be a consultant, like John Schiefer was, working during the day to help companies to secure their networks, and being a hacker at night. He knew all the security glitches in the company network that he had worked with.
    Excellent, He is John Schiefer. Can you rewrite "Schiefer represented the nightmare scenario of a trusted insider who uses his knowledge for criminal purposes" for me?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In English adjectives have three forms: normal, comparative, and superlative.These have different meanings.

    Normal: bad
    comparative: worse
    superlative: the worst

    Normally a "nightmare" scenario is very bad (a normal adjective), so it is not the same as "the worst possible" (a superlative). There could be more than one "nightmare scenario" for a company. That is why most sentences, like your sentence in post #5, say "a nightmare scenario".

    However, the sentence in Mafiaboy says "the nightmare scenario". Using "the" here implies it is unique. So "worst possible thing that could happen" is a reasonable re-wording for this sentence.
     

    hack3rcon

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Can it mean "Schiefer show the worst scenario of a consultant that has access to the sensitive information" ?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Can it mean "Schiefer show the worst scenario of a consultant that has access to the sensitive information" ?
    This sentence compares multiple scenarios, all of them having "a consultant that has access to sensitive information", and says this is the worst one: he commits crimes with it. I don't see that multiple-scenario meaning in the Mafiaboy sentence, shown here:

    Schiefer represented the nightmare scenario of a trusted insider who uses his knowledge for criminal purposes
    But I see where you got that idea: the way of is used here looks like its use in "the worst of (several)". But I am sure we can't say "the nightmare (scenario) of (several)", using "nightmare" as a superlative like "worst". That is too far from normal English. But as a non-native you have no way to know that.

    Instead "of" is used differently here. The sentence is punctuated badly. "Nightmare" and "of" are in different phrases, which should be separated by a colon or a comma:

    Schiefer represented the nightmare scenario: (the scenario) of a trusted insider who uses his knowledge for criminal purposes.
     
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