Trusty

Packard

Senior Member
USA, English
There is an on-line vendor of counterfeit watches named "Trusty Time".

Now, when I hear the term "trusty" I think of prisons. A prisoner who has been incarcerated for a long time and has an excellent record for good behavior is sometimes given jobs within the prison that require he have additional privileges. These prisoners are called "trusties".

So when I read then name "Trustytime.com" I think of felons.

Is this also so in the UK, Australia, and other English-speaking areas? Or do you think of "trustworthy" when you hear of "Trusty"?


As a side note they claim that they have an excellent reputation for integrity. Integrity from a company whose very business model is based on the violation of international laws? Hmm...
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I guess it is the close association between "trusty" and "time" that is doing it for me. "Doing time" and becoming "a trusty" go together.

    (I do have a trusty old fragmentation grenade--not to be used in elevators, however.)
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I suppose the answer is to buy one and see. 'Trusty' to me means loyal, faithful, ever present and reliable (usually in service or operation); it does not put me in mind of doing time - and I've a feeling, though I'm no jailbird, that the 'prefect' prisoners to which you refer are pronounced as per 'trustees', but I may be deluding myself there.
     

    DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Is this also so in the UK
    In British prisons, the staff refer to them as "Governor's Red Bands" on account of a distinctive armband that they wear. The cons dismissively call them "Joeys", which is an allusion to budgerigars: i.e. the Governor's pet.
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    I think the "trusty" works in a prison (evidently Packard and I keep the same company), and a "trustee" is someone who administers funds for a beneficiary. Depending on their honesty in the latter, they might end up as the former.
    I think "Trusty time" sounds OK, kind of 19th century (never heard of them actually). Businesses don't often consider all the ramifications. I once was shopping for a watch, and the young salesgirl showed me one by the company Guess. I told her I didn't want a watch that guessed what time it was. She just looked at me like I was a batty old lady. There is a line of young women's clothing called "Tarea." I saw it advertised when I was shopping with my teenaged daughter. My reaction was, Who wants clothes called "homework" (in Spanish)?
     

    Destruida

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I believe you are correct. (I think I've been out in the general population too long.:D)
    I've only heard it as trusty/trusties in the context of prison (interpret that as you wish) but otherwise, as Beryl explains it. Trust is a traditional name for sheepdogs and other working dogs; Trust or Trusty for other dogs (because you need one distinct and distinvtive sound for a working dog) but now they're probably called Gaga.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thanks for all the replies.

    I think I'll stick with my Timex and let others buy fake Rolex watches from Trusty Timothy.

    Regards,

    Packard
     
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