Tube

namlan

Banned
Vietnam
- I often go to school by subway.
- Can I say "by tube" instead of "by subway"?

Thanks a lot!

NamLan
 
  • Joobs

    Banned
    Glasgow, Scotland - English
    "Tube" is British English for "subway." It depends where you are, then.

    Oh, here's a link to Dictionary.com. You might wish to try using it now and then.
    Actually, it is a term used really only by the English and those in London. In Glasgow (the only other UK city with an underground system and the 3rd oldest in the world) we refer to our underground system as the "Subway" or less commonly the "Underground".
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Actually, it is a term used really only by the English and those in London. In Glasgow (the only other UK city with an underground system and the 3rd oldest in the world) we refer to our underground system as the "Subway" or less commonly the "Underground".
    I thought that might be the case.
     

    ladybugEnglishFan

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Can you say "tube" only in London. Why?
    Can you say "metro" meaning underground? What is written on the tables /boards (I don't know how to call them) that indicate that there's an underground station? "Underground"?
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Can you say "tube" only in London. Why?
    Can you say "metro" meaning underground? What is written on the tables /boards (I don't know how to call them) that indicate that there's an underground station? "Underground"?
    I've moved your question to this existing thread, ladybugEnglishFan, as it covers the same topic.

    As discussed, "the tube" seems only to be used in London. "The tube" is an expression which developed in the late 19th c. and quickly became common and then virtually standard, in informal speech, at least. When other cities constructed similar underground railways they came up with their own names for it. Perhaps "tube" did not travel, as it were, because it was not the official name.

    Interestingly the first underground passenger transport railway (now part of the London Underground) was called (or was part of) the Metropolitan Railway, so might have been called "the Metro", as it is in Paris.

    I believe the "official" name is London Underground, but the authority that runs it often refers to it as the Tube in documents, etc. (see the official site, for example).
     
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