tucazo

El Vagabundo

Member
USA (English)
Hi, can anyone help me with a specialized baseball term. It's from an article in the El Sentinel newspaper in West Palm Beach, Florida. It's about the 600th homerun that was hit by Alex Rodriguez and caught by a security guard named Babilonia. It's as follows: "Babilonia candido trabajador de 23 anos, estaba en lugar ideal, pero con el uniforme equivocado aquel 4 de agosto cuando A-Rod conecto su tucazo historico."

Thanks for your help.
 
  • cubaMania

    Senior Member
    tucazo el golazo de ferreti en la final de la 90-91 con ese zurdaso del tuca ese gol nos hiso campeones sobre el america y ademas que tecnica la del tuca
    Apparently it comes from the soccer final of 1990-91 when Ricardo "Tuca" Ferreti scored some sort of amazing season-winning goal for Mexico against U.S. In Spanish it's a "gol", but is intensified to "golazo" if sufficiently spectacular. Presumably this particular spectacular goal got named "tucazo" for the player Tuca. Your source may be going a bit far afield applying the term to a baseball homerun.
    You can find all kinds of YouTube videos of the original "Tucazo" by searching for "El Tucazo".
     
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    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I think it's neat that they used a Latino/Mexican cultural reference rather than a straight translation of a news story in English. I just wonder if it would be universally understood. Would anybody who follows soccer know about the "tucazo" ... ?
     

    Juan Jacob Vilalta

    Banned
    Español/Francés
    I think it's neat that they used a Latino/Mexican cultural reference rather than a straight translation of a news story in English. I just wonder if it would be universally understood. Would anybody who follows soccer know about the "tucazo" ... ?
    Not me... I know Tuca Ferreti very well (I support Pumas), but never heard about his so-called tucazo. (That's soccer, not baseball).
    Let's wait.
     

    JeSuisSnob

    Ombudsmod
    Mexican Spanish
    "Tucazo" in that context is the home run. However, I like baseball and I've never heard that word as a synonym of homerun (I've heard "bambinazo", "vuelacercas" and some others). To me, it has to do more with the Colombian use of "hard blow" than with the Tuca Ferreti (perhaps the OP's note was written by a Colombian).

    Look at this note: Matan a paisa de un tucazo.

    Let's wait for more inputs.
     
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    didakticos

    Senior Member
    Español de Costa Rica (y de otras partes también)
    De acuerdo al DRAE:

    tuco,ca
    6. m. C. Rica y Nic. Trozo de madera, hierro u otro material.


    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

    Nunca he escuchado tucazo como sinónimo de jonrón. Es más, nunca antes había escuchado la palabra tucazo. Preferimos otras modalidades más sonoras y gráficas, tales como garrotazo y leñazo.

    syat
     

    Juan Jacob Vilalta

    Banned
    Español/Francés
    De acuerdo al DRAE:

    tuco,ca
    6. m. C. Rica y Nic. Trozo de madera, hierro u otro material.

    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

    Nunca he escuchado tucazo como sinónimo de jonrón. Es más, nunca antes había escuchado la palabra tucazo. Preferimos otras modalidades más sonoras y gráficas, tales como garrotazo y leñazo.

    syat
    Ah, aclarado... o sea, golpe de leña. :) Vaya, jomrón.
     

    JeSuisSnob

    Ombudsmod
    Mexican Spanish
    De acuerdo al DRAE:

    tuco,ca
    6. m. C. Rica y Nic. Trozo de madera, hierro u otro material.

    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

    Nunca he escuchado tucazo como sinónimo de jonrón. Es más, nunca antes había escuchado la palabra tucazo. Preferimos otras modalidades más sonoras y gráficas, tales como garrotazo y leñazo.

    syat
    "Tucazo" comes from "tuco". This clarifies our doubt utterly. :thumbsup:

    (And by the way, I've also heard those two --"garrotazo" and "leñazo"--.)

    Gracias, didakticos.
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Very interesting, and not what we originally thought!
    But I still wonder why the writer used "tucazo" if it's not universally understood ...
    Then again, sports *stories* (not "notes" ;)) in English often use creative or obscure terms, to avoid saying the same old thing day after day.
     

    JeSuisSnob

    Ombudsmod
    Mexican Spanish
    But I still wonder why the writer used "tucazo" if it's not universally understood ...
    Perhaps it is a regionalism. Maybe in some countries "tucazo" is used to talk about a hit with a piece of timber (possibly in Colombia?).

    Then again, sports *stories* (not "notes" ;))
    [I was talking about a "nota periodística" (the genre). However I will ask in the proper thread. Thanks, K. :)]
     
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    Milton Sand

    Senior Member
    Español (Colombia)
    Hi,
    Yes, first thing I thought was "tucazo" meaning just "golpe durísimo (very strong hit), batazo (a hit with a bat)," just like in that article about that paisa killed by a tucazo. By extension, that could refer to a home run... who knows?

    But let's wait for any Caribbean member. Baseball is not that popular in my region.

    Regards,
    ;)
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    There's no doubt in my mind now that it means "monster hit" (in sports lingo). Of course, that's not how you would translate "tucazo" in other contexts, such as the story about the beating death. There it would be "Paisa beaten to death with board," or whatever kind of wood it was (I disremember).
     
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