Tuppence

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chesty

Senior Member
english
Hello. In truth, we can't say. They may think that you are the ugly one.

Also, if one or more of them is declaring an interest in your "tuppence", then it sounds as if they want more than a bit of loose change. Savvy?
 
  • DavyBCN

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    I'd love to know the slang meaning of 'tuppens'. My imagination is running wild!
    It is a slang expression, not used too much now, to euphamistically talk about female sexual organs. I do not remember ever having seen written, so can't say whether it is tuppence (two pennies) or tuppens. I have no idea of its origin in this context.:)
     

    chesty

    Senior Member
    english
    Hello.

    Yes. Tuppence is a euphemism for vagina, however, i cannot fathom whether this solely childish slang or whether it is also used by adults.


    I presume also that this is a British slang form.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    This puts an entirely new spin on the song "Feed the Birds" from the musical "Mary Poppins."

    "Though her words are simple and few,
    Listen, listen, she's calling to you:
    Feed the birds, tuppence a bag,
    Tuppence, tuppence, tuppence a bag."

    Written by Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    Is this a reference to a two penny whore or a tuppeny whore indicating a prostitute so undesireable that only the utterly desperate would employ.

    .,,
     

    waspsmakejam

    Member
    UK, English
    Tuppence meant two pennies, and now means two pence. I still use tuppeny bits ;)

    I agree that a woman's tuppence is her "front bottom", and is usually used in a sexually derogative way. (The alternative word "minge" was merely anatomical). I have no idea if its rhyming slang.

    As a child in east London I found the song "Feed the Birds" hilarious. Mummy (Irish) loved it and did not know why Daddy hated it nor why her children found it hilarious when she sang it in his absence. Similarly Daddy refused to allow us to watch the TV series featuring Agatha Christie's husband and wife sleuths "Tommy and Tuppence". I'm guessing that as Mummy, Walt Disney, Agatha Christie and my other half (parents from West London, raised in various locations across Europe) and the Online Oxford English Dicitonary do not know the "front bottom" meaning, its geographical spread is limited.

    The word also crops up in some respectable idioms, where it generally means worthless. "I don't give tuppence" (roughly speaking, "I don't care")
    "its not worth tuppence" or "I wouldn't give tuppence for it" (its worthless).

    Truppenny bits (as well as being rhyming slang for tits) were coins worth three pence, which as I recall had 5 sides. They unfortunately disappeared at decimilisation. I was outraged. My sweetie money changed from a thruppeny bit a week to tuppence. I eventually managed to negotiate a raise to a bob (five pence), but I still miss truppeny bits.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    A thrupenny bit had many more than five sides - count for yourself - HERE, HERE.

    Is there a possible connection between the meaning of tuppence as discussed here and tup (noun, a ram) or tupping (what a ram does naturally)?
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    sarcy is right when she says that 'thrupenny bit' was used in Cickney slang to mean 'tits' (see http://www.londonslang.com/db/t/), but the original question referred to 'tuppence' although I see I had misread it in my post (tuppens). There is no reference to this in the above mentioned dictionary so I suppose it's anybody' guess.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    It seems perfectly clear that if a young bloke is talking to a young woman in a flirtatious manner and asks to see her 'tuppenies' he obviously wants to see her twopenny bits and this is obviously rhyming slang for tits with the added visual reference of two separate round penny bits.

    The rhyming slang is along the lines of;
    Show us your two penny bits.

    Perhaps we are participating in a slowly unfolding egg-yolk.

    .,,
     

    MISTERMOPPS

    New Member
    FRENCH
    Tuppence meant two pennies, and now means two pence. I still use tuppeny bits ;)

    I agree that a woman's tuppence is her "front bottom", and is usually used in a sexually derogative way. (The alternative word "minge" was merely anatomical). I have no idea if its rhyming slang.

    As a child in east London I found the song "Feed the Birds" hilarious. Mummy (Irish) loved it and did not know why Daddy hated it nor why her children found it hilarious when she sang it in his absence. Similarly Daddy refused to allow us to watch the TV series featuring Agatha Christie's husband and wife sleuths "Tommy and Tuppence". I'm guessing that as Mummy, Walt Disney, Agatha Christie and my other half (parents from West London, raised in various locations across Europe) and the Online Oxford English Dicitonary do not know the "front bottom" meaning, its geographical spread is limited.

    The word also crops up in some respectable idioms, where it generally means worthless. "I don't give tuppence" (roughly speaking, "I don't care")
    "its not worth tuppence" or "I wouldn't give tuppence for it" (its worthless).

    Truppenny bits (as well as being rhyming slang for tits) were coins worth three pence, which as I recall had 5 sides. They unfortunately disappeared at decimilisation. I was outraged. My sweetie money changed from a thruppeny bit a week to tuppence. I eventually managed to negotiate a raise to a bob (five pence), but I still miss truppeny bits.
    I love your story !
     

    The Philosopher

    Member
    British English
    what about "2 bob bit" .

    in context : after a ruby and a few jars I was dying for a 2 bob bit

    My grandma was always saying this
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I confess that the extraneous meanings of "tuppence" were all completely alien to me. It's simply a sum of money. When I wur a lad you could feed a family of a hundred and six for a year for tuppence.

    I'm not sure if The Philosopher's post is asking for an explanation or provoking a question, but I'll fall for it and declare that, by my understanding, his grandma was dying for a shit.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    Truppenny bits (as well as being rhyming slang for tits) were coins worth three pence, which as I recall had 5 sides. They unfortunately disappeared at decimilisation. I was outraged. My sweetie money changed from a thruppeny bit a week to tuppence. I eventually managed to negotiate a raise to a bob (five pence), but I still miss truppeny bits.
    I have a feeling they had twelve sides, not five.:) I had one somewhere here, but I'm blessed if I can find it now!
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm not sure if The Philosopher's post is asking for an explanation or provoking a question, but I'll fall for it and declare that, by my understanding, his grandma was dying for a shit.
    By mine, too:D. It appears that The Philosopher's granny always had the urge to go to the loo after a curry and a few drinks.
     
    Last edited:

    Spira

    Banned
    UK English
    Tuppence meant two pennies, and now means two pence. I still use tuppeny bits ;)

    Truppenny bits (as well as being rhyming slang for tits) were coins worth three pence, which as I recall had 5 sides. They unfortunately disappeared at decimilisation. I was outraged. .
    Yes, nice story.
    As I remember it in 1971 the clipped pronunciation of the terms tupp'nce, thrupp'nce and even sixp'nce changed overnight to the longer two-pence, three-pence and six-pence (or 2p,3p and 6p), perhaps in order to distinguish between the two. Lord knows that a lot of people were confused by the change.

    I also have memories of the thrupenny bit being withdrawn BEFORE decimilisation, like the half-crown. Wikipaedia however does not agree with me on this.

    Finally, just as an anecdote, in 1798 a 2d. (tuppenny) coin was introduced. It was large and cumbersome and did not catch on, and was quickly withdrawn from circulation.
     

    The Philosopher

    Member
    British English
    This one does anyone recognise this one, a firm favourite when I was a kid .."he´s as bent as a five bob note"

    Someone mentioned a 12 sided shape earlier and I had to look up what it was called , it`s a dodecagon.......If you speak Spanish this , I imagine, would be quite funny.
     
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