Turn it up and down.

icefcx

New Member
Chinese
Hi guys. This is my first post in this lovely forum. Here i am seeking a favor for the actual meaning of this phase "turn it up and down." I can feel the vague meaning of that, but i want it to be more specific. This phase is derived from the magzine The Economist. Here is the quotation:

[In Russia, fascism is not the political expression of a popular movement. The Kremlin uses fascism to keep the masses from organizing and exercising political power.] " The Kremlin and television bosses can turn it up and down. In the early years of his presidency Mr Putin used money to keep the people out of politics. After the economy stalled in 2011-12 and the urban middle class came out on the streets to demand more rights, he stoked nationalism and hatred. During the political calm after the annexation of Crimea in 2014 fascism was turned down as suddenly as it had come up."

Thank you guys for the replies.

< Edited to comply with 4-sentence limit on quotation (Rule 4). Cagey, moderator >
 
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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    This should mean that the Kremlin and television bosses can spend more or less time talking about fascism in their communications with the masses.

    When people are restless and focused on problems in the economy, etc., the Kremlin and the bosses spend a lot of time talking about fascism and the threat that it poses to the nation. When the political situation is calmer, they spend much less time discussing fascism.
     
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    icefcx

    New Member
    Chinese
    This should mean that the Kremlin and television bosses can spend more or less time talking about fascism in their communications with the masses.

    When people are restless and focused on problems in the economy, etc., the Kremlin and the bosses spend a lot of time talking about fascism and the threat that it poses to the nation. When the political situation is calmer, they spend much less time discussing fascism.
    Your reply inspired me a lot. Now i get this vague expression. It's quite like a volume knob on a tv. The Kremlin and TV bosses can adjust the volume in accordance with a certain political situation in their favor.
    Thank you owlman 5. You are so full of knowledge.😁
     

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I can feel the vague meaning of that
    Vague meaning may be all there is to feel. The general idea is obvious - the metaphor of a switch which can increase or decrease the level or intensity of something , like a volume switch; but what exactly is being turned up or down? Maybe we need to read the whole article, but I'm not at all sure that it refers to the degree of prominence given in public discussion to fascism as a threat to the nation. Indeed , the fact that at times he [Putin] 'stoked nationalism and hatred' suggests that he promoted fascism, since these are often thought of as characteristic features of fascism. The fact is that fascism is a very fluid concept; many articles and academic papers have been written to justify the description of Putin's regime as 'fascist'; and as many, I suppose, to argue that it isn't. I would take 'turn it up and down' to mean that the Kremlin and television bosses (i.e. Putin, since politicians and media are Putin's executive and voice) increase or decrease what might be described as the fascist characteristics of public policy and statements of policy. That's not a very neat formulation, but I think the writer couldn't find a very precise way of expressing himself either. (As you see from the first sentence quoted, Russian fascism is not, for the author the same as fascism elsewhere; but it's still fascism - you just adapt your definition; anything is possible on that basis.)
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Maybe we need to read the whole article, but I'm not at all sure that it refers to the degree of prominence given in public discussion to fascism as a threat to the nation.
    You may well be right. My own interpretation owes a lot to various U.S. news sources that commented on Putin's claims earlier this year that Russia's aggression against Ukraine was a denazification mission. This paragraph from a New York Times article* is typical of what I am referring to:

    A data set of nearly eight million articles about Ukraine collected from more than 8,000 Russian websites since 2014 shows that references to Nazism were relatively flat for eight years and then spiked to unprecedented levels on Feb. 24, the day Russia invaded Ukraine. They have remained high ever since.

    *NYT: How the Russian Media Spread False Claims About Ukrainian Nazis, Charlie Smart, July 22, 2022.
     
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