Turn of the year

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Does "turn of the year" meaning "the moments (a few hours) until the new year comes" sound natural/correct in the examples I created below?

a. I spent the turn of the year at my parents' house. It was great.
b. I celebrated the turn of the year at home with my wife. It was amazing. And you, Anna? How was your turn of the year?

Thank you in advance!
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I've never heard anybody say that. People used "the turn of the century" when talking about the period around 1800s through the 1900s, but we don't refer to the the period around the year 2000 that way much.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you very much.

    Is "New Year's Eve" a better option in my O.P (the moments (a few hours) until the new year comes)?

    a. I spent New Year's Eve at my parents' house. It was great.
    b. I celebrated New Year's Eve at home with my wife. It was amazing. And you, Anna? How was your New Year's Eve?
    Thank you in advance!
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    No to all of them.
    Turn of the year does not refer to a specific time like New Year's Eve, but a much more general period of time which could, depending on context, cover several weeks.

    What you probably want is (the) New Year, referring to New Year's Eve, New Year's Day and possibly a day or two either side.

    I understand American usage is it say "New Year's" (but please dont rely on my word), whereas in British English it is "(the) New Year" and we only use the possesive if following it with something like "Eve" or "resolution".

    Edit: In answer to your second post, New Year's Eve is perfect if you are just referring to those few hours.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree with both replies.

    You could say "I saw in the new year at my parents' house." It means that you were at your parents' house at 11.59 p.m. on 31 December, and it strongly suggests that you were actively waiting for the new year to begin.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you very much, Sound Shift.

    Could I use "ring in the new year" as in "I rang in the new year at my parents' house" meaning "I was, in the few hours before the new year, looking forward for the new year to arrive" ?

    Thank you in advance!
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    a. I spent the turn of the year at my parents' house. It was great.
    b. I celebrated the turn of the year at home with my wife. It was amazing. And you, Anna? How was your turn of the year?
    Neither work, but "the turn of the year", as uncle Jack says, is a BE phrase that is often used in a narrative description "The turn of the year gave more hope to Jane when, in January, she found a bottle of cheap whiskey hidden in the cupboard." (Jane Eyre first folio.)

    It is not synonymous with The New Year, and covers from about 31st Dec. to early February.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    One last question:

    At the exact moment just before midnight - 11:59 - (on December 31st), people usually count down: 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1,...and greet each other, say "Happy New Year", hug, let off fireworks, etc. Can I call this exact moment "the coming of the new year"?

    Thank you in advance!
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Thank you very much, PaulQ.

    Would you use "ring in the new year" in my post #7?
    I'm puzzled by this. I am sure it is still used in some contexts but I have no recollection of using it myself or hearing it from my friends. It is puzzling that I am both sure it is used but not sure by whom! Maybe other people, like media people use it to denote activity at this time of year?
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    One last question:

    At the exact moment just before midnight - 11:59 - (on December 31st), people usually count down: 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1,...and greet each other, say "Happy New Year", hug, let off fireworks, etc. Can I call this exact moment "the coming of the new year"?

    Thank you in advance!
    Speaking for myself: "The beginning of the New Year.", or "We saw in the New Year at my parents' house.", as in s s's #6.

    "New Year's Eve" is for me the celebrations/festivities that take place in the last hours of 20XX and the first hours of 20XX+1.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you.

    Context: Millions in China «rang» in the New Year

    ''In London/UK the arrival of New Year is marked by the bell Big Ben in the clock tower of the Palace of Westminster striking the first (of twelve) chime of midnight. In Scotland this moment is actually referred to as "the bells". (We stayed in for the bells and then went out = we went out after New Year had struck). There is therefore a strong connection between bells ringing and New Year in BE culture.'' (Glasguensis - Wordreference)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In that extract, "the arrival of New Year" works perfectly well (to convey "the moment in time when one year ends and the next starts"), but it is not, in itself, an idiomatic phrase.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    ''In London/UK the arrival of New Year is marked by the bell Big Ben in the clock tower of the Palace of Westminster
    Or "The arrival of the New Year found Ferdinand Magellan heading west in the Pacific Ocean." Here "The arrival of the New Year" means "at some time on January 1st."
     
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