Turn over the pancake.

Bagsensei

Senior Member
Japanese
Hello, everyone.

I'm wondering if could use the expression 'turn over' in making pancakes? :)
If you cook pancakes in a pan, you have to cook both sides.
"Turn over the pancake."
Thank you.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    There is nothing wrong with saying "Turn over the pancake" but I think people say "Turn the pancake over."

    The other verb we use with pancakes is flip: "Flip the pancake."
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    To come full circle, for me "turn over the pancake" sounds like a crime scene.

    Now, if you don't turn over the pancake on the count of ten, we are going to barge in.

    :confused:

    I'm pretty sure Bags' context was about cooking.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    You have a linguistic question.

    Turn the pancake over.

    Is almost always correct and idiomatic, but not always. Can you provide a sentence for further details? I would like to hear more about the pancakes!
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    There is a difference between verb phrases where the preposition goes at the end (of the predicate) versus verb phrases where the preposition goes right after the verb. It's asking a lot of someone to learn it all at once.
     

    Nonn

    Senior Member
    Japan - japanese
    Now, if you don't turn over the pancake on the count of ten, we are going to barge in.
    I thought this was really funny and wanted to find out more about the usage of "turn over" and so I googled and I found this
    turn over - Dictionary Definition - the second part of no. 1 says "turn over the pancake."

    So can I take that "turn over the pankcakes" is not wrong but not the most natural sounding to some native speakers?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I would more easily say "Turn the pancake over", though there's nothing wrong with "Turn over the pancake". I find it quite interesting that I would naturally say "Turn over the page", and not "Turn the page over".

    If I turn something upside down (like a pancake), I would go for "Turn the pancake/omelette over".

    I would reserve "Turn over the..." for pages or "a new leaf".

    When gardening I think I could equally well "turn the soil over" or "turn over the soil".
     

    Nonn

    Senior Member
    Japan - japanese
    You have a linguistic question.

    Turn the pancake over.

    Is almost always correct and idiomatic, but not always.
    I find this really interesting! Especially after the examples that Velisarius gave. Is this a case of "because native speakers say it this way" or are the reasons to why the preposition goes after the verb or at the end of the sentence. I am not sure if Bagsensei will provide more details but I'm very interested in what you said and hope you will explain a little more, RedwoodGrove.
     
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