turn power on

Ume

Banned
Japanese
Can I say "power" in place of the phone? I don't think so.
I don't think that "turn power on" makes sense, because "turn on" means "to make a machine or piece of electrical equipment such as a television, engine, light etc start operating by pushing a button, turning a key etc." Power is not a machine or piece of electrical equipment.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In other situations, you might turn the power on. However, that is different from turning the phone on.

    So, you are right; you cannot change the wording without changing the meaning ~ and whether or not "turning the power on" makes sense would depend on how the phone works.
     

    Greyfriar

    Senior Member
    Can I say "power" in place of the phone? I don't think so.
    I don't think that "turn power on" makes sense, because "turn on" means "to make a machine or piece of electrical equipment such as a television, engine, light etc start operating by pushing a button, turning a key etc." Power is not a machine or piece of electrical equipment.
    Hello Umeboshi,

    We do say 'turn the power on'. In your sentence the power to the phone is turned on by switching the on/off key.

    Another example: Move the switch down to turn the power on.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    Press the On/off key for a minimum of 10 seconds to turn the phone on.

    I don't see that there is a problem in saying Press the On/off key for a minimum of 10 seconds to turn the power on.

    One could say the same for any electromechanical device e.g. computer, washing machine etc.

    To turn the power on means to power up the machine. One does this by connecting up the device and switching the power on. Some machines are permanently connected and have to be turned on, others need to be be plugged in but are then live and can be used. If a machine is live or powered up it will function.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    Personally I still prefer "turn the phone on." If it ran of the mains, where power supply is not an integral part of the device then perhaps I would use "turn the power on" but presumably this is a mobile?

    I you had to use the word "power" I would be more inclined to say "power up the phone."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top