turn the stove control knob to a higher level: How to say it?

farhad_persona

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everyone.
What do we say when we want to ask someone to put the stove control knob to a higher level.
I mean what is the verb to do that? to get the burner's flame bigger...
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Turn the gas up. (in my house we cook with gas, or you could say turn IT up)
    You need to turn the gas up.

    He turned the gas up.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    I have an electric stove, but wouldn't say "turn the electricity up." I would have to say "turn the heat up" or "turn the burner up" (or down, to reduce the temperature). I probably would have used "heat" or "burner" when I had a gas stove, but could have used "gas."
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    May I say :
    Turn the stove up to the highest degree/temperature
    Turn the stove up the highest
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    May I say :
    Turn the stove up to the highest degree/temperature
    Turn the stove up the highest
    The first one is good and explanatory. The second one we wouldn't use. I usually get the message across with: Turn it to high. (High is understood to be highest.)
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    The first one is good and explanatory. The second one we wouldn't use. I usually get the message across with: Turn it to high. (High is understood to be highest.)
    Heaps of thanks, Copyright, for confirmation.
    I wouldn't ask my son any more to turn the campfire up to the highest flames:p.
     

    farhad_persona

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Wow! thank you guys...
    Would I say cook this in/on mild flame?
    What would I say when the flame is low or high? Like cook this in low flame?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In recipe books, they talk about cooking food over low/ medium/ high heat. When everyone cooked with gas, talking about the flame made sense. If some of the people who will read the instructions use electric stoves, it is better to talk about heat.

    (I am speaking from my experience with American cookbooks. British cookbooks may be different.)
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    We don't use "mild" for an intermediate setting for a stove burner, at least in the U.S.
    On my stove, the marked settings are:
    Warm (abbeviated WRM)
    Low (LO)
    Medium (MED)
    Medium-High (MED HI)
    High (HI)

    Note that "lo" and "hi" are NON-STANDARD spellings of "low" and "high."
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    I might mention that I normally wouldn't talk about turning the *stove* up - I would instead use one of the other terms - the heat, the gas, perhaps the burner (but I think, with burner, I would say "turn the burner to high" rather than "turn the burner up") I can also turn the oven (up) to 350 degrees (but not just turn the oven up, normally - I would almost always specify the temperature to which you should turn it)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, I agree that stove (also cooker BE) is too general, and would include the oven, the burner and maybe a grill. Other possibilities:

    Turn the burner up to maximum
    Turn the oven up to maximum
     

    Majalrayo

    Senior Member
    spanish spain
    Please, and what about if it is low or medium heat, is it said?:

    Turn the burner to low/medium heat

    Put it on low heat


    and, if it is vitroceramics, is it said?:

    Turn the hob to low heat

    Put the hob on low heat

    Thank you
     

    Majalrayo

    Senior Member
    spanish spain
    I certainly have never hobnobbed with anybody who used it. ;)

    This existing thread will provide more information: ceramic cooktop / ceramic hob
    Hello, thanks to you both!, I understand by the link you sent me "hob" is the British word; not clear, though, at least for me, after reading the thread, which is the North American counterpart for that word. Cheers!
     

    Majalrayo

    Senior Member
    spanish spain
    Thank you Cagey!, excellent, Cooktop seems to be the word in North America; you were right, I had to look at it again ;), so I guess it is said: turn the cooktop on.
     

    KHS

    Senior Member

    Majalrayo

    Senior Member
    spanish spain
    I use stove, but I've also heard range. I've never heard anybody except an appliance salesperson use cooktop, but I'm sure someone must. No one I know, though.
    Thank you so much JustKate, your answer makes me think there is a terminology which basically belongs to manual books, and the classical words stove and cooker are the ones in use. Best regards
     
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