turnabout

Padre Chris

Member
English -- USA
How would you say "turnabout"?
For example, I want to say "turnabout is fair play," meaning basically that when someone does something to you, it's only fair to do something to them in return.
Thanks!
 
  • Seymour M

    Senior Member
    Castellano - España
    There's a latin expresion, not very used but I like it a lot, with the same sense: "quid pro quo", one for another...

    Un saludo.
     

    Pey

    Senior Member
    Argentina (spanish)
    "Pagarle con la misma moneda" ó "Vengarse" (a pesar de que suene muy fuera de contexto se puede aplicar)

    También se me ocucrrió... "darle un poco de su propia medicina", la cual es vista es muchas peliculas.
     

    Áristos

    Senior Member
    español (España)
    Hi everyone,

    I was wondering if there is any verb which collocates with the noun "turnabout".
    E.g. "science made/took a complete turnabout" or something along those lines.

    Would any of those be correct? If not, how should you use that word?

    Thanks in advance.

    Cheers.
     

    sandpiperlily

    Senior Member
    I wouldn't use "turnabout" but rather "turnaround" in that context (if you're trying to say that science changed a lot or took a very different direction, especially if the change was an improvement).

    Edited to add: with "turnaround" the verb is usually "made" -- "After she was grounded, Mary made a quick turnaround and immediately corrected her behavior."
     

    Áristos

    Senior Member
    español (España)
    Thank you for your kind answer.
    I asked about "complete turnabout" because, while the Collins Dictionary suggests that word as a possible translation of "giro de 180 grados" or "giro radical", it doesn't give any verb which collocates with it.
    However, I'll rather take your suggestion and use "make a turnaround" instead.

    Thanks again.
     

    SydLexia

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi Aris!

    "the direction of scientific inquiry changed radically",

    "science began to direct its attention elsewhere",

    "research efforts began to be directed elsewhere",

    "research took off in an altogether different direction".

    Its a very wide question if you don't tie things down a bit....


    syd
     

    Áristos

    Senior Member
    español (España)
    Hi there Syd!

    A scientific inquiry was actually the heart of the matter. I don't know why I didn't mention this from the beginning instead of just writing "science" :eek:.

    Thanks once again for all your excellent suggestions.

    Cheers.
     
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