English base twang

Dictionary entry: twang

stramb

New Member
Italian - Italy
Parlata: "How Tennesseans talk expresses their regional identity and often draws comment by people from elsewhere. Whether they call it a “Tennessee twang” or an “East Tennessee brogue,”
 
  • MünchnerFax

    Senior Member
    Dictionary Editor
    Italian, Italy
    Ciao. Dici che è parlata in generale? Perché sembrerebbe essere un certo suono particolare, nasale appunto come traduciamo noi.
     

    stramb

    New Member
    Italian - Italy
    Si', si riferisce anche a un certo tono nasale, ma nel modo in cui e usato nella frase citata da "Hillbilly Elegy" si riferisce inequivocabilmente al modo di parlare nel suo complesso. Un semplice tono nasale non puo' 'esprimere una identita' regionale' e ad ulteriore conferma, viene anche definita East Tennessee "brogue” che, Merriam-Webster definisce "a dialect or regional pronunciation", il che mi fa aggiugere come possibili altre 2 traduzioni: vernacolo, dialetto
     
    Last edited:

    MünchnerFax

    Senior Member
    Dictionary Editor
    Italian, Italy
    Let's bring the English team into the discussion then. If it can refer to a regional inflection in general, then we may need a new English sense.
     

    DrD

    Senior Member
    Dictionary Editor
    England English
    Hello,

    Thank you for your messages. Most dictionaries say this is a nasal intonation quality, but Lexico says it is "A nasal or other distinctive manner of pronunciation or intonation characteristic of the speech of an individual, area, or country." I had a look at the full OED, which splits it into two senses:

    1. The modification of vocal sound by its passage through the nose; nasal intonation, as formerly attributed to the Puritans; now esp. as characterizing the pronunciation of an individual, a country, or locality. More fully nasal twang, twang of the nose.; and
    2. A distinctive manner of pronunciation or intonation differing from that usual, or regarded as the standard, in a country; esp. one associated with a particular district or locality.

    So, it seems the nasal sound came first, and then the meaning became broader. I'm in two minds about whether to add a new sense or whether to simply change the one we have to 'distinctive intonation' instead of 'nasal tone' (in line with the Lexico definition, which conflates the two senses from the OED). What would seem most useful/easiest from your point of view @MünchnerFax?
     
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