twilight’s outrider

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jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
She woke around three-thirty, a little stiff but otherwise feeling rested and refreshed. For the next two and a half hours she plucked the chickens, resting when the work put too much misery into her arthritic fingers, then going on.
<...>
When she finished the last chicken, each of her fingers had a migraine headache and the daylight had begun to take on that still and golden hue that means twilight’s outrider has arrived. Late July now, and the days were shortening down again.

Source: The Stand by Stephen King
Context: Abagail is preparing chicken food for her guests.

Is it correct to gloss that the golden hue is the outrider (kind of forerunner) of the color spectrum as the morning sky's colours unfold?

Thank you.
 
  • lordignus

    Senior Member
    British English
    An outrider was a cavalryman that would ride ahead of the main body of soldiers, like a scout.

    If an opposing army were to see an outrider, they would know what would be following behind him.

    I'm sure you can figure out the metaphor from there :p
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It seems to me this is taking place in the afternoon. Twilight comes before evening. She talks about the days "shortening". She's talking about sunset.
     

    jacdac

    Senior Member
    Lebanese
    Thank you. Awesome. I guess metaphors such this one are usually confined to literal writing and do not sneak into daily dialogues.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I guess metaphors such this one are usually confined to literal literary writing and do not sneak into daily dialogues.
    Yes, daily life is not like a book. It's much plainer for most people.

    take on that still and golden hue that means twilight’s outrider has arrived.
    The golden hue is twilight's outrider and twilight is night's outrider. Everything has its place.
     
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