Two-handed

Hello everybody,

Does the expression "two-handed"(meaning: using both hands equally well; ambidextrous -W.R dictionary) sound natural/correct in the examples I made below in everyday speech?

A. I am two-handed. I can write equally well or do anything else with both hands.
B. Are you two-handed? I see you use both hands equally well.

Thank you in advance.
 
  • ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    The term "two-handed" usually means using both hands at once - to wield a sword, for example.

    Hi, JS, Did you mean "requiring the use of both hands"?, or something like that (for a sword)?
    It can also mean "for two people", as in "a two-handed card game". But definitely,"amidextrous" in your OP, XdS.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Hi, JS, Did you mean "requiring the use of both hands"?, or something like that (for a sword)?
    It can also mean "for two people", as in "a two-handed card game". But definitely,"ambidextrous" in your OP, XdS.
    The sword was just an example. I think the commonality is "two hands at once". SOme long saws for cutting down trees need someone one each end and have two "handles so could be two-handed (although perhaps those might be 4-handed:eek: )
     
    Top