Two-letter names

Hi,
I have a question:
With names that are made up of two letters, like D.J. (which may stand for Donna Joe) or A.J. (which may stand for Alex John) what's the grammar rule for the word after them?
For example, these names must end with a period > D.J. or A.J.
So the word after that period should be capitalized? For example: "D.J. Is the oldest sister" or D.J. is the oldest sister?

Do you know what these two-letter names are called? Taking into account they're just the initials of the first and middle names.

Thank you in advance.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The period for an abbreviation doesn't end the sentence so the next word doesn't need to be capitialized as if it were the first letter of a new sentence.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I don’t know what they’re called but I do think the . points are required.
    Used that way the period mark shows an abbreviated form. That’s NOT the end of a sentence so you do not follow with a capital letter.
     
    I don’t know what they’re called but I do think the . points are required.
    Used that way the period mark shows an abbreviated form. That’s NOT the end of a sentence so you do not follow with a capital letter.
    Thank you so much :)

    I found that there's something similar that is called "Initialism" but it works more for brands and organization names, like NFL, CIA, etc.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don’t know what they’re called but I do think the . points are required.
    I disagree that they are required. In BE it is increasingly the norm to not use points when initials are used - I haven't used them in my name for the past 50 years. For an example, here's the heading of a 2008 paper in the journal Acta Pædiatrica (the journal of a Swedish foundation)
    Patent ductus arteriosus evaluation by serial echocardiography in preterm infants
    DJ O'Rourke A EL‐Khuffash C Moody K Walsh EJ Molloy
    (I thought I'd stick with PaulQ's choice of DJ O'Rourke ;) )
    Doing away with the punctuation resolves the question, though I suspect that it is needed in AE.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with Andygc, even omitting points with the potentially confusing MR James (an early-twentieth century writer of ghost stories). I see the British Independent newspaper also omitted points in this article in 2016. In the heading, the sub-editor added a space between the two letters, but it is written as "MR" without a space in the body of the article:
    The enduring power of M R James
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I don't use the full stops and many people don't include the space between them (DJ O'Rourke, as in post 7 by Andy). I just call them 'initials' (agreeing with Paul, post 4). In some British contexts, given names are standardly reduced to initials.
     
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