Two towers and twin-towered

mrxkms

Senior Member
Arabic-English
Two towers and twin-towered

Is there any difference in meaning between the two expressions? Or is it just a figurative meaning?

Here is the text to have a full idea of what I am asking about.

The monumental twin-towered façade of Qasr al-Hair al Gharbi was discovered in the Syrian Desert in 1936.

Is ok to paraphrase this text to be like this:

The two monumental towers façade of Qasr al-Hair al Gharbi was discovered in the Syrian Desert in 1936.

Is the meaning the same or is it affected by this paraphrasing?​
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The first "twin-towered façade" is correctly using twin-towered, adjective.
    It suggests that the façade has two identical towers.

    The second, "two monumental towers façade" is incorrectly trying to use a plural noun (towers) as an adjective.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You could say:
    "The monumental two-tower façade ... "
    Notice that we have to move things around and join some things so it is clear what modifies what, i.e. it's not "two facade", or "two monumental", or "monumental two".
     

    mrxkms

    Senior Member
    Arabic-English
    I am sorry dear Panjandrum

    I can't get what you said

    Can you please paraphrase the text without using the expression twin-towered?
     
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