typing a document

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goldencypress

Senior Member
India - Malayalam
What is the word for rendering a handwritten document (manuscript) into a typewritten document - either digital or physical / hard copy?

Is it TYPESETTING?

Thank you.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Typesetting" doesn't carry that meaning, golden cypress. I can't think of one word that covers the meaning you are trying to express. I would merely say that I typed or typed out a copy of a handwritten document.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    "Typesetting" doesn't carry that meaning, golden cypress. I can't think of one word that covers the meaning you are trying to express. I would merely say that I typed or typed out a copy of a handwritten document.
    Thank you, owlman5. The problem is, I use voice to text app and although it IS typing, it's not conventional typing with fingers using a keyboard.

    Hence I find it rather odd to use the word TYPE or TYPE OUT.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You might consider saying that you made a copy of a handwritten document with a voice-to-text application. That may be a little wordy, but it is accurate.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I use voice to text app and although it IS typing, it's not conventional typing with fingers using a keyboard.

    Hence I find it rather odd to use the word TYPE or TYPE OUT.
    It’s not typing, as such. And it’s certainly not typesetting.

    These days, what you’re doing – by whatever means – is digitising text, so that it can be read, edited and/or printed from electronic devices.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    You might consider saying that you made a copy of a handwritten document with a voice-to-text application. That may be a little wordy, but it is accurate.
    TyThank y, owlman5. I think that eorwo
    It’s not typing, as such. And it’s certainly not typesetting.

    These days, what you’re doing – by whatever means – is digitising text, so that it can be read, edited and/or printed from electronic devices.
    Thank you, lingobingo. I'll use this word.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    Using your voice-to-text?:D Or just your smartphone keypad acting up?

    I think I'd say I dictated my manuscript into a computer.
    Sorry for the typos :). Now, consider this situation. You do not know how to type. You have handwritten a document and you want to send it for publication. You want someone to DIGITISE it so that the printer can read it easily and edit it. There your suggestion won't work, I'm afraid.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    You have handwritten a document and you want to send it for publication. You want someone to DIGITISE it so that the printer can read it easily and edit it.
    "Typesetting" is something printers did, before computers: they "set" the text in movable type (they put thousands of individual metal letters into racks, to use in printing pages).

    "Digitize" isn't right either. That is used for data (numbers).

    You are "creating a text file". You are "putting your text into a text file". Then you can email the text file to the printer.

    Note: your "text" is the set of words and punctuation, which you have now in handwritten form.

    Note: There are many different kinds of (computer) file. There are several kinds of "text files" (computer files designed to hold writing). Nowadays printers use digital methods for printing. They can easily copy text from any text file (in any text file format) into a file in the format their printing program uses.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Typesetting" is something printers did, before computers: they "set" the text in movable type (they put thousands of individual metal letters into racks, to use in printing pages).
    You’re talking about hot metal typesetting, which was largely superseded in the 1970s by a series of different systems in which the text was input via a keyboard. One of the earliest keyboard machines was the IBM Composer, a glorified electric typewriter with proportional spacing. Larger systems began as direct entry but soon progressed to data storage, at first via paper tape and progressing right up to to laser technology. By about 1990, the advent of the personal computer and “desktop publishing” software had knocked the photosetting industry firmly on the head.
    "Digitize" isn't right either. That is used for data (numbers).
    Text is data. And it’s digitised by converting the characters into numbers:
    ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) is the most common format for text files in computers and on the Internet. In an ASCII file, each alphabetic, numeric, or special character is represented with a 7-bit binary number (a string of seven 0s or 1s). 128 possible characters are defined. (What is ASCII - WhatIs.com)

    … as this guide is concerned with the creation of electronic texts, it will focus primarily on text and images, as these are the main objects in the digitization process. (Creating & Documenting Electronic Texts)

    [OCR] is a common method of digitising printed texts … (Optical character recognition - Wikipedia)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Text is data. And it’s digitised by converting the characters into numbers:
    The user is not converting text into numbers. The user is entering text into a computer by typing on a computer keyboard. I know all about ASCII (and EBCDIC, and 16-bit ASCII), but most people do not know about ASCII. No-one uses ASCIi to type things into a computer. To enter an "a" they hit the A key.

    I suppose "digitizing" ("digitising" in BE) is acceptable for OCR. Has OCR become good enough to handle handwritten documents?
     
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