Tyrant / Tyrannical / Tyrannous

< Previous | Next >

Dr. JCVRD

Senior Member
Persian
Hi again

I'd really appreciate your sharp and helpful advice I often receive. I have another question about "Tyrant", please. Which one of the sentences below makes sense better? Or maybe you have a better suggestion? By the way, I do want to keep the word "mayor" in the sentence.

1. "Matthew is a territorial tyrant mayor."
2. "Matthew is a territorial tyrant-type mayor."
3. "Matthew is a territorial tyrannical mayor."
4. "Matthew is a territorial tyrannous mayor."
5. Any suggestion???

Can I use the word "tyrant" itself as an adjective like in sentence 1?

Thanks a lot!
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Tyrannical' is the only obvious fit.
    'Tyrant' would be fine if 'tyrant mayor' was more common. You could have, for instance, a tyrant king, but it sounds a little odd with 'mayor'. However, if the mayor is of particular importance such that, for instance, you would use the definite article (even if he wasn't tyrannical), then I think 'the tyrant mayor' could work well. However, you have used the indefinite article, so this doesn't apply.
     

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    'Tyrannical' is the only obvious fit.
    'Tyrant' would be fine if 'tyrant mayor' was more common. You could have, for instance, a tyrant king, but it sounds a little odd with 'mayor'. However, if the mayor is of particular importance such that, for instance, you would use the definite article (even if he wasn't tyrannical), then I think 'the tyrant mayor' could work well. However, you have used the indefinite article, so this doesn't apply.
    So I will pick up "tyrannical" as you said. Thank you.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I have no idea what this is about, but if you want it to sound natural, I would suggest "Matthew is a territorial and tyrannical mayor".
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I understand what "tyrannical" means in that sentence -- but why is "territorial" there? If the actual title of his position is "territorial mayor", then the two elements cannot be separated by an adjective.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I took it to be an adjective, meaning that the man is aggressively defensive of his territory, his area of jurisdiction.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top