UK money question

delriego

New Member
Hi! I'm Jose, from Mexico

I'm teaching a business English course and my book uses UK English, that's hard for me because here in Mexico we usually learn American English.

An exercise about numbers talks about "£4.30" if it was American English (and money) that would be "four dollars and thirty cents" but I have heard that you don't say cents but pence or just "p"

isn't that the informal way? could you say in a business meeting "four pounds and thirty pee"?

I couldn't find a "search in threads" box, I'm sorry if this has been already asked.

Gracias
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Most of the time, even in a business meeting, I would imagine four pounds thirty would be sufficient. For a more formal version, I would use four pounds and thirty pence.
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Most of the time, even in a business meeting, I would imagine four pounds thirty:tick::thumbsup: would be sufficient. For a more formal version, I would use four pounds and thirty pence.
    I only ever use "p" in speech when the unit is under a pound.
    So, "Can you pass me that 50p on the table?" (fif-tee-pee) etc.

    If we're over £1 then I wouldn't use it. It sounds odd used there, really really redundant.
    You need it when it's under £1, otherwise someone will just say "You want me to pass you 50 what?"
    I guess I might say pence, but it's so formal-sounding I just can't imagine a situation where I would use it (when I'm not in a formal situation).
     
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