Ukrainian: I have just started learning Ukrainian

mateo19

Senior Member
Split from here - the question now is about "Ukrainian: I have just started learning Ukrainian".

Привіт, Наталко! :)

Ги-и-и, це правда, ти маєш рацію! Це тільки "чи ... чи".
Я ще новий студент української мови, знаєш. Але завжди "прави" мене! (Чи це правильно, "правити"?)

Доброго дня!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Natabka

    Senior Member
    Ukraine (Ukrainian)
    Я ще новий студент української мови, знаєш. Але завжди "прав" мене! (Чи це правильно, "правити"?)


    Привіт, Матео!
    Отже, як ти просив, ось деякі виправлення -
    (Hope the moderators won't mind this little "off-topicness" ;))

    "Новий студент" is correct but it doesn't mean "the beginner". You can say this about a "new student in a class", something like that. For "beginner" I would suggest the word "початківець". (Я - початківець в українській мові. Я тільки-но почав вивчати українську мову. - I have just started learning Ukrainian.)

    "Правити" means "to correct mistakes in written or oral text", but usually by a specialist, trained to do that, before publishing. "Виправляти" is suitable in our context. - Завжди виправляй мене!

    Have a nice day, Mateo!
    Гарного дня!

    (And I'm not sure as for "доброго дня!" for saying "good bye". "Добрий день/Доброго дня" is usually used for saying "hello")
     

    mateo19

    Senior Member
    Привіт, Матео!
    Отже, як ти просив, ось деякі виправлення -
    (Hope the moderators won't mind this little "off-topicness" ;))

    "Новий студент" is correct but it doesn't mean "the beginner". You can say this about a "new student in a class", something like that. For "beginner" I would suggest the word "початківець". (Я - початківець в українській мові. Я тільки-но почав вивчати українську мову. - I have just started learning Ukrainian.)

    "Правити" means "to correct mistakes in written or oral text", but usually by a specialist, trained to do that, before publishing. "Виправляти" is suitable in our context. - Завжди виправляй мене!

    Have a nice day, Mateo!
    Гарного дня!

    (And I'm not sure as for "доброго дня!" for saying "good bye". "Добрий день/Доброго дня" is usually used for saying "hello")

    Thanks once again for the corrections. Sometimes I feel hopeless, you know. "Знаєш" was a dumb mistake, but the other things I didn't know. This must be crazy, because I don't know Russian - I study Ukrainian - but Russian has poorly influenced my Ukrainian. There is a thread in Russian explaining that you can say "добрый ден" upon greeting someone but that "хорошего дня" is only suitable for wishing someone a good day when two people part company (say goodbye).
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1115443

    So, either Western Ukrainian has a lot of differences with other versions of Ukrainian or Russian and Ukrainian deceptively appear to have a lot of similiarities when in fact they differ!!! :-s But you are the native speaker and I respect and bow to your word. One last thought though. "Доброго дня" is in the genitive which fits the verb бажати, so you are effectively wishing this to the other person... But I suppose you could wish someone a good day upon meeting them or upon parting. Owell. :)

    Бувай, Наталю!
     

    Natabka

    Senior Member
    Ukraine (Ukrainian)
    Привіт, Матео!

    There is a thread in Russian explaining that you can say "добрый день" upon greeting someone but that "хорошего дня" is only suitable for wishing someone a good day when two people part company (say goodbye).
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1115443

    Well, well, there are two words - "добрий" (uk) / "добрый" (ru) and "хороший"(ru)/"добрий, гарний, хороший" (uk). You wished "Доброго дня!" which is perfectly okay: if you want to say it, do it :). With my remark, though, I wanted to say that it is uncommon to finish message/letter/conversation with this expression. Russian "хорошего дня!" in Ukrainian would be "гарного (хорошого) дня!" not "доброго" (different colocability) I'm not saying that this is a rule, but it's just my observation from everyday usage.

    So, either Western Ukrainian has a lot of differences with other versions of Ukrainian or Russian and Ukrainian deceptively appear to have a lot of similiarities when in fact they differ!!! :-s But you are the native speaker and I respect and bow to your word. One last thought though. "Доброго дня" is in the genitive which fits the verb бажати, so you are effectively wishing this to the other person... But I suppose you could wish someone a good day upon meeting them or upon parting. Owell. :)
    Yeah, the problem is that we do not have many active Ukrainian speakers here and - well, you have no choice but trust my words :D. I admit that I'm just a speaker (native, however) of Ukrainian not a teacher, that is I haven't learned Ukrainian professionaly, like a philologist. Although, I have a lot of reference materials, so I don't invent things (in most cases, haha).

    P.S. Maybe we could discuss the translation "хорошего дня"-"гарного дня" with Russian colleagues in that thread?

    P.P.S. I have already started the discussion here http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1234042
    Let's hope, somebody will join in :)
     
    Last edited:

    mateo19

    Senior Member
    Привіт знов, Наталю!

    I like to be thorough and make Word Reference a true reference for these great language that we study, so I wanted to point out that my book has some explanatory notes about the verbs for "to learn" or "to study", учитися and вивчати.

    -Я вчуся української мови (with учитися, the object of what you are studying goes in the genitive).
    -Я вивчаю українську мову (with вивчати, the object of what you are studying goes in the accusative).

    My book also points out the nuances between учитися and вивчати. It says that вивчати is a more thorough and scholary way of studying:

    -Він навчився української мови. - He has learned Ukrainian.
    -Він вивчив українську мову. - He has mastered Ukrainian.

    Finally it states that while both verbs can be used with an object, only учитися can be used to mean "studying in general" without naming the subject:

    Наталя любить учитися. - Natalya loves to study.
    Юля добре вчиться. - Julia studies well.

    On a cross-linguistic note, Slovak also has two verbs that mean to study or to learn: učiť sa and študovať. Učiť by itself means "to teach". So, "Učím sa po slovensky" means "I study Slovak" and "Študujem slovenčinu" is the more formal version that means that Slovak is my area of study at the university. The first verb is the one that can be used without an object: "Peter sa dnes musí učiť celý deň", "Today Peter must study all day long". Študovať doesn't need an object either (so I cannot draw a complete parallel between Ukrainian and Slovak): "Študujeme na Pittsburskej univerzite", "We study at the University of Pittsburgh" and "Študovala v Bratislave", "She studied in Bratislava". But of course we know this means that she studied at a university there... not that she went to the park and studied a book under a tree. LOL
     

    nat_kovalenko

    New Member
    Ukrainian
    Split from here - the question now is about "Ukrainian: I have just started learning Ukrainian".

    Привіт, Наталко! :)

    Ги-и-и, це правда, ти маєш рацію! Це тільки "чи ... чи".
    Я ще новий студент української мови, знаєш. Але завжди "прави" мене! (Чи це правильно, "правити"?)

    Доброго дня!
    Привіт! Правильно буде "виправляй", "завжди виправляй мене".
    До речі, мене теж звуть Наталка😊 Приємно познайомитись
     
    Top