Ukranian: Шум (GO_A song)

Drakonica

Senior Member
Polish
I'm not sure if this is a question for this forum, but what is "Шум" in this song?

In "наробили шуму" it's noise, but in other places, written with a capital letter. Is it just Noise or something else?

p.s. 1 I've found this explanation:
The lyrics of this song is a variation of Ukrainian folk songs which were sung in the "Shum" folk ritual.[9][10] The ritual involved a game and was performed in spring. According to some ethnographers, Shum refers to the god[9] or personification of the forest.[11] Etymologically, the name of the ritual probably comes from Proto-Slavic words šumъ ("noise") or šuma ("forest").[12]

p.s. 2 I've found something more:
Трактування суті «Шума»[ред. код]

На думку історика Михайла Грушевського, «Шум» символізував розбуджену космічну енергію, а «всі жартовливі, пародійні рими, витіснивши первісний текст, з'явилися задля розваги і сміху значно пізніше, коли хоровід зійшов на просту забаву».[3][1]

На думку деяких дослідників, слово «шум» у цій гаївці означає ліс (на що може вказувати, зокрема, те, що сербською ліс зветься «шума»),[7][8] а у пісні вбачають риси анімістичного світогляду.[8] В трактуванні Лідії Козар, «шум» у веснянці — це персоніфікований образ шуму першої весняної зелені.[1] Валерій Войтович вважав, що Шум — це ім'я давньослов'янського бога лісів[9].
So it is a dance / game. And mayby a name of god.

But is it a living element of modern traditions or a historical phenomenon known only to ethnographers. Do you know a god with that name?
 
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  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    But is it a living element of modern traditions or a historical phenomenon known only to ethnographers. Do you know a god with that name?
    Kievan Rus was baptized in the end of the 10th century. Original paganistic cults which involved worshipping of the old gods likely continued to exist among the peasantry roughly until the 13th century or so (going away together with the original tribes who worshipped them). Since then there was only a diffuse system of primitive beliefs with occasional cajoling of various spirits and magical (in the strict ethnographic sense) rituals. We wouldn't even know the very names of Perun or Dazhbog without the medieval Christian chroniclers who were kind enough to write them down.

    Ukrainian dictionaries mention шум as 1. noice (common Slavic), 2. foam (from German) and 3. "a (traditional) game and a being mentioned in it", which summarizes it quite neatly. The rest is just more or less scientific speculations.
     
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