Ulcered Sphincter of Ass-erica

meramli

Senior Member
turkish
Topic phrase: Ulcered Sphincter of Ass-erica
added by Cagey, moderator.


V For Vendetta (Movie)

I think It's high time we let the colonies know what we really think of them. I think it's payback time for a tea party they threw for us a few hundred years ago. I say we go down to those docks tonight and dump that crap where everything from the Ulcered Sphincter of Ass-erica belongs!

I understood nothing from this expression, can you explain? Thanks in advance.

Note: The other phrase is discussed in this thread: dump that crap
Cagey.
 
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  • meramli

    Senior Member
    turkish
    All of that, but maybe some part of it can help for me to understand, for example Ulcered Sphincter of Ass-erica.

    Please correct if there are grammatical mistakes in my writings.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Have you looked up "ulcer," "sphincter," and "ass" in the dictionary? The speaker is substituting these words for "United States of America."
     

    meramli

    Senior Member
    turkish
    I have problem also 'dump that crap' (which I asked in another thread) and because I didn't understand it, I have problem following expressions, I think there are metaphors in that expressions, but it's hard for me to understand them because we don't have them in our language. Can you explain them? Thanks.

    Please correct if there are grammatical mistakes in my writings.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    There's no real metaphor involved in "Ulcered Sphincter of Ass-erica." The speaker is expressing his disdain for the USA by substituting vulgar words for the actual ones.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    You need to give us more information about what is still confusing you. If we don't understand where the problem is, we can't possibly address it.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It is simply an insult aimed at the USA by using insulting words. It would be like calling The Republic of Turkey something like a "Ridiculous old turd" - there is no hidden meaning or metaphor, just pure insult.:(
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The speaker you quote is clearly extremely hostile to the USA, the United States of America. To express his disgust of the USA he takes the initial letters of each word and substitutes other words which happen to start with the same letter to make a very unpleasant sounding name
    He says Ulcerated instead of United, and Sphincter instead of States and ends up by saying 'Ass erica' instead of America.

    'Sphincter' refers to the muscle of the anus ( 'ass- hole').
    'Ulcerated' refers to an extremely unpleasant skin condition, with open sores or wounds in skin and flesh, which can be difficult to heal.
    'Ass' is slightly vulgar slang for 'backside' or 'buttocks'. I am not sure how usual it is these days compared with 'arse' in BE. I suspect it's very common indeed. 'Ass' may have replaced 'arse' in BE.
    I hope that helps you to understand.
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    There's no real metaphor involved in "Ulcered Sphincter of Ass-erica." The speaker is expressing his disdain for the USA by substituting vulgar words for the actual ones.
    Um, I would say there is a very clear metaphor at play. In the expression 'dump the crap where everything from the ulcered sphincter of Ass-erica belongs', crap is another word for feces, thus the 'crap' in question (I don't know what it is, whatever they plan on dumping into the sea) is the feces from America's ulcered sphincter. I.E. it is the worthless produce of America's diseased anal passage (or Ass-erica, implying that America is itself the world's diseased anal passage). It's a slightly laboured expression, because 'Ulcerced, Sphincter and 'Ass' are all words chosen to fit the letters 'USA', rather than more understandable words like the ones I suggested, 'diseased anal passage'. An ulcer is a type of disease, the sphincter is a specific part of the back-passage, 'ass' is self-explanatory, although 'Ass-erica' is not a hugely intelligent coinage.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    It's worth noting that although the quotation in #1 is supposedly spoken by a Brit (I assume, from the content), the film script was actually written by the Wachowskis, who are American, and who probably wouldn't know their arses from their donkeys.:D

    Ws
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    Would it help your understanding of the passage if you knew what the author means by "a tea party they threw for us a few hundred years ago"? One of the incidents of the American Revolutionary War (the war of independence from Britain) occurred in 1773, when a group of protesters threw a shipment of tea from Britain into the harbour at Boston, to protest against the imposition of taxes on the American colonies without any representation in the British Parliament.

    For the Boston Tea Party:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Tea_Party
     
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    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's worth noting that although the quotation in #1 is supposedly spoken by a Brit (I assume, from the content), the film script was actually written by the Wachowskis, who are American, and who probably wouldn't know their arses from their donkeys.:D
    The movie is based on the graphic novel with the same title, which was written by a British man named Alan Moore, from Northampton. It was published in the 1980s and is often interpreted as referring, indirectly & metaphorically, to the conflict between Thatcher's government/administration and their opponents. Usually, when a graphic novel is made into a movie, lines from the movie that stand out like this and sum up a character's reaction to something are taken directly from the graphic novel, not written new for the movie.

    * * *

    I think the explanations of the "U.S.A." bit might not be as helpful as intended because it might not be clear to a Turk what some of the other bits mean, which give the "U.S.A." insult its context. So...

    the colonies
    This is how some British people sometimes refer to the USA. The USA began as colonies of the British Empire, then became and independent nation later. < ---- > [It's still sometimes used] when criticizing the USA, <> because it implies that the USA doesn't really belong in or deserve to be in its current position of power and influence, which the UK was in before the USA was.

    I think it's payback time for a tea party they threw for us a few hundred years ago.
    In the last several years before the USA became independent, there was a lot of political conflict here on the subject of independence, and a big part of that was the question of whether the UK's government was entitled to impose taxes on the colonies. The most famous protest was the Boston Tea Party, in which a group of colonial citizens boarded cargo ships full of tea from India in Boston Harbor and threw all of the tea into the water. It was a response to a tax on tea; they figured that rejecting or accepting the tea shipment meant rejecting or accepting the British government's entitlement to tax them. < --- >

    I say we go down to those docks tonight and dump that crap where everything from the {USA} belongs!
    He's suggesting throwing a shipment of products from the USA into the sea so they're destroyed, in a symbolic rejection of the USA & its influence by reversing the original Boston Tea Party and the whole revolution that went with it.

    < Edited to remove comments that may be misunderstood and distract from main points of the post. Cagey, moderator. >
     
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    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    The movie is based on the graphic novel with the same title, which was written by a British man named Alan Moore, from Northampton. [...] Usually, when a graphic novel is made into a movie, lines from the movie that stand out like this and sum up a character's reaction to something are taken directly from the graphic novel, not written new for the movie.
    That may often be true, but I doubt that it's the case here. Alan Moore formally dissociated himself from the movie because he was so disappointed with the way the Wachowskis had changed everything (the script, the plot, the theme, the characters, the underlying messages) to reflect then-current American political and social issues.

    On the subject of Prothero's speech in the film, which contains the 'Ulcered Sphincter of Ass-erica' line quoted in post #1, author Melissa Croteau (London's Burning: Remembering the Gunpowder Plot and 17th Century Conflict in V for Vendetta) writes: "the Wachowski Brothers' script obviously indicts [...] of the United States through Prothero's speech".

    All of that, combined with the unlikelihood of a British author, especially in the 1980s, calling an arse an ass, suggests to me that that line probably didn't appear (at least in that form) in Moore's original text. (And if Moore had an ass, he'd probably keep it in a field.)

    Ws
     
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