un abbraccio sentito

Kotler

Member
Sweden Swedish
Un amico ha firmato un SMS con "un abbraccio sentito". Non ho mai visto quest'espressione prima e non so se riferisce al verbo "sentire" o se si tratta forse di un certo modo di dire? è comune questa frase?

A friend of mine signed a text with "un abbraccio sentito". I´ve never heard that expression before and I don't know whether it refers to the verb "sentire" or if it is an expression? Is this a common phrase?
 
  • Hermocrates

    Senior Member
    Italian & British English (bilingual)
    A friend of mine signed a text with "un abbraccio sentito". I´ve never heard that expression before and I don't know whether it refers to the verb "sentire" or if it is an expression? Is this a common phrase?
    The verb "sentire" has many meanings in Italian. Among others, "to hear" and "to feel".

    In this case "un abbraccio sentito" literally means "a heartfelt hug".

    I hope this helps! :)


    Rye
     

    dc2fla

    New Member
    English - US
    Is "un abbraccio sentito" an appropriate close for a note I'm writing to thank a friend who sent me a note of encouragement? She closed her note (in English) with "big hugs and best wishes." As Italian is her first language, and we sometimes exchange greetings in Italian, I wanted to respond accordingly and correctly using "un abbraccio" in a phrase that's not "cuddly". Background- She as an executive with a client of mine. We've worked together for many years. now between projects we share updates on family (our children, husbands), colleagues, etc. as well as each other.
     

    effeundici

    Senior Member
    Italian - Tuscany
    I think it's very beautiful. I would like to receive it.

    I'd probably write Un sentito abbraccio. I dont' know why.

    Or you could write Un abbraccio affettuoso (affectionate)
     

    dc2fla

    New Member
    English - US
    Thank you - She has been such a good friend. I found the phrase elsewhere on these forums, but in a different context. Why do you suggestadjective before the noun? Does it change the meaning or is it for emphasis?
     

    effeundici

    Senior Member
    Italian - Tuscany
    Buh, sometimes we swap adjective and noun and the meaning changes

    un vecchio amico (an old friend) - un amico vecchio (an elderly friend)

    Sometimes we swap only for style reasons

    un abbraccio sentito = un sentito abbraccio
     

    dc2fla

    New Member
    English - US
    Yes, as in French in which I'm much more fluent... I like the suggested flip, it's seems a warm touch and still in the vein I was seeking. Thank you for your quick response!
     
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