un beso muy fuerte

< Previous | Next >

helena357

Senior Member
USA/ English
Hi! I'm new to this forum.

I was just wondering how "te mando un beso muy fuerte" would be translated from a letter and is it always just considered simply polite or "friendly" when a man says it to a woman or something more??

Thanks!
 
  • VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    helena357 said:
    Hi! I'm new to this forum.
    Howdy!
    If you'll read the rules, they're great for newcomers. Enjoy! :p

    helena357 said:
    I was just wondering how "te mando un beso muy fuerte" would be translated from a letter and is it always just considered "friendly" when a man says it to a woman or something more??
    I would translate it as, "I'm sending you a big kiss". As far as I know, it has a friendly connotation. I am a girl, and I've had both sexes say it to me, without a sexual connotation.



    What do natives say?...
     

    Eugin

    Senior Member
    Argentina (Spanish)
    In Latin America it´s pretty usual to end a letter to a friend with: "Te mando un beso muy fuerte" (Personally, I use: "Te mando un beso grande" y "Un fuerte abrazo", but tastes are tastes, you know!!!!). IMHO, it doesn´t have any sexual connotation, as Venus pointed out.
    You could simply say it to your mother, your friend or to a colleague from work....

    hope this helps!!
    regards!!
     

    helena357

    Senior Member
    USA/ English
    Thanks so much for the clarification! One more question. If friends use that phrase, what would a boyfriend say to a girlfriend or vice versa? The same thing?
     

    dafne09

    New Member
    Spain,Spanish
    A boyfriend/girlfriend would say "te quiero" or anything lique that..... young couples usually say "tq/tqm/tqcl"...just to abreviate... but u can also say that to a friend... it's hard to explain... we usually writte the first thing that come to our mind, doesn't matter if we say it 2 a friend or something more......sorry I'm not a big help!:)
     

    Jack4

    New Member
    Spanish
    I think this depends a lot on the relationship the couple has. But couples usually end as well with un beso muy fuerte and usually put behind the quiero mucho. There is no real formula for ending a letter between couples.
     

    Santiaguina

    New Member
    Chile, Spanish
    helena357 said:
    Hi! I'm new to this forum.

    I was just wondering how "te mando un beso muy fuerte" would be translated from a letter and is it always just considered simply polite or "friendly" when a man says it to a woman or something more??

    Thanks!
    This is my first time visiting the forum and I have to agree with all the other comments. Although in Chile we would likely use "te mando un abrazo bien (or "muy") fuerte y un beso grande" both are correct. There are different ways of expressing the same thing and true enough, these statements do not carry any sexual connotation.
    Saludos!
     

    medio-payaso

    Senior Member
    U.S. English/ Peru Español
    A lot of my female friends end their emails to me like that......I think you have to understand the fact too, that in spanish culture, when you greet people, you kiss them (ok, the guys kiss the girls, and the girls kiss each other) and then before you leave, you always kiss everyone to say goodbye too........All this is done on the cheek of course.

    But I think that the phrase comes from that, and the kiss is usually accompanied by a hug too.

    Kinda weird at first, but a lot of fun after you get used to it!
     

    Loli

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    hey! men kiss each other between friends in Argentina!
    and that has no "gay" connotation at all! ;)

    Look:
    you say XOXOXOXOXO
    which means kisses and hugs...
    and that's how we would greet a friend as well:
    besos y abrazos!
    And you also say Big Kiss
    for what we say Un beso fuerte! or Un beso grande!

    Now: to my boyfriend (currently... husband) I would have told him:
    ¡Beso enorme! Te amo,
    And my name. :)

    As you can see... we nearly use the same expressions (just different language, emphasis... and of course background of culture)
     

    GiggLiden

    Senior Member
    English US
    Loli said:
    Now: to my boyfriend (currently... husband) I would have told him:
    ¡Beso enorme! Te amo,
    And my name. :)
    Currently? Are you planning to trade him in??? How many miles on his odometer? How is his gas consumption?
    :)
    Un beso pequeño. (Demo version)
    :) :)
     

    Mei

    Senior Member
    Catalonia Catalan & Spanish
    VenusEnvy said:
    Howdy!
    If you'll read the rules, they're great for newcomers. Enjoy! :p


    I would translate it as, "I'm sending you a big kiss". As far as I know, it has a friendly connotation. I am a girl, and I've had both sexes say it to me, without a sexual connotation.



    What do natives say?...
    Sip, I agree.
     

    ampurdan

    Senior Member
    Català & español (Spain)
    GiggLiden said:
    Currently? Are you planning to trade him in??? How many miles on his odometer? How is his gas consumption?
    :)
    I don't understand your joke. Does not "currently" mean "presently", "at this time"? What has it to do with trading cars in? I'm puzzled.
     

    GiggLiden

    Senior Member
    English US
    (QUOTE)
    Originally Posted by GiggLiden
    Currently? Are you planning to trade him in??? How many miles on his odometer? How is his gas consumption?
    :)


    I don't understand your joke. Does not "currently" mean "presently", "at this time"? What has it to do with trading cars in? I'm puzzled. (QUOTE)
    -------------------
    Let me explain it THIS way: when you use "el baño" on an aircraft, the room is presently/currently/at the present time "occupied." We all wait around, because we know, sooner or later, the lady WILL come out.

    I was just bemused by the concept of "presently/currently/at the present time" having this husband. Meaning, if we wait around a little, he'll be "available," for one reason or another. In which case, we should find out how much wear and tear he will show, and how much mileage is still left on him.

    The questions about HIS condition ("Are you planning to trade HIM in??? How many miles on HIS odometer? How is HIS gas consumption?") were meant to apply to the "current husband," not his Lamborghini. I guess I just didn't phrase it clearly.

    Onward and upward ................
    :)



    :) :) :)
     

    Loli

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Gigg... In fact... I think he is out of gas...
    In fact... he must be... otherwise he wouldn't have married me! right?
    ;) (btw... good way of teaching "humor" in a different language... sometimes more than difficult to understand...thank you!)
     

    GiggLiden

    Senior Member
    English US
    Loli said:
    Gigg... In fact... I think he is out of gas...
    In fact... he must be... otherwise he wouldn't have married me! right?
    ;) (btw... good way of teaching "humor" in a different language... sometimes more than difficult to understand...thank you!)
    I am SO happy and so very much relieved, Loli, that you read and accepted my facetious comment in the gentle spirit of friendly joshing with you that was intended; or, as they sing in Gilbert & Sullivan's "The Mikado," "a source of innocent merriment." Want me to hum it for you?

    I totally agree with you on the difficulty of jokes clearing the borders of different languages intact, and with the same twisted puns and double entendres that create the humor. It will take MANY more years before I'll be able to tell a Spanish joke and get the same ROTFL response as I do from English funnies. Just as a "for instance," I'll tell you one of my favorites (in English) in the next message. I have NO idea how this would come across in Spanish.

    Carpe diem
    Saludos
     

    GiggLiden

    Senior Member
    English US
    Loli said:
    hey! men kiss each other between friends in Argentina!
    and that has no "gay" connotation at all! ;)
    The joke I promised you, Loli:
    ----------------
    Graffiti on Cafe Cino's men's room (Greenwich Village, New York City):

    Somebody had scrawled, ''my mother made me a homosexual" ..

    and underneath, someone else replied ... ''if I bring her the wool, will she make ME one, too???''
     

    Loli

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I will tell you the truth:
    I did understand the meaning in both cases...
    Just that as for me is is a 2nd language, I could not associate the difference that for you has the "make me" as in terms of influence,
    and also in terms of creating.... ;)

    Good joke! I think we can request a new topic within Additional Forums, something like: Jokes & Chistes
    ;)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top