un-wedgable/wedgable oak [wedgeable]

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Unoverwordinesslogged

Banned
English - Britain
Hullo. What would be the meaning of an un-wedgable/wedgable oak/tree?

Found this but its not enough. http://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/is-there-a-better-way-to-do-this.192908/

<<For the more wedgable trees I would suggest backcutting, inserting a wedge as soon as possible, then face cut it, and finish it off by driving the wedge a bit more. It will take less time than other methods because of its simplicity.>>

gnarled (adj.)
c. 1600, probably a variant of knurled, from Middle English knar "knob, knot in wood" (late 14c.), earlier "a crag, twisted rock" (early 13c.), from a general group of Germanic words that includes English knob, knock, knuckle, knoll, knurl. Gnarl (v.) "make knotty," gnarl (n.) "a knotty growth on wood," and gnarly (adj.) all seem to owe their existence in modern English to Shakespeare's use of gnarled in 1603: Thy sharpe and sulpherous bolt Splits the vn-wedgable and gnarled Oke. ["Measure for Measure," II.ii.116] "(Gnarled) occurs in one passage of Shakes. (for which the sole authority is the folio of 1623), whence it came into general use in the nineteenth century" [OED].
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    My try:

    People use metal wedges to split wood, especially difficult-to-split wood.
    This wood cannot be split even with a wedge.

    Note: Here is the Wiki-How article on How to Split Gnarly Firewood.
    At step 10, they show how the wedge is used.​
     

    GinevraD

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Latin America
    @Cagey that is also what I gather
    to wedge: to force apart or divide with or as if with a wedge
    "Jupiter hurling his bolts to earth." [wordreference.com]
     
    Last edited:

    Unoverwordinesslogged

    Banned
    English - Britain
    Great answer. Thank you.

    Guessing this also backs things up(?)...

    "fought the stars; nor cease their hands To cleave the wedged oak, and cedar sweet, Or bear in groaning wains the trunks away"

    (The Æneid of Virgil)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The link takes me to a discussion about felling trees - with wedges being part of the equipment employed. Make a cut (with a saw) on one side of the base of the trunk and put a wedge in. The cut the other side ... etc. The wedgeable seems to describe those trees for which the process is successful, while for the others (unwedgeable) it is not recommended.
    That's what I came away with.
     

    Unoverwordinesslogged

    Banned
    English - Britain
    The link takes me to a discussion about felling trees - with wedges being part of the equipment employed. Make a cut (with a saw) on one side of the base of the trunk and put a wedge in. The cut the other side ... etc. The wedgeable seems to describe those trees for which the process is successful, while for the others (unwedgeable) it is not recommended.
    That's what I came away with.
    Maybe Shakes meant both kinds of wedging wood. I thought google returns showed the word 'gnarl' is more related to smacking in wedges so as to split hard/gnarled woods rather than cutting out wedges to fell trees. Also Shakes talks of splitting rather than felling.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Sorry - your original post was not very clear that you were asking about the Shakes(peare) usage. Then the lack of fracture/split planes in wood with very contorted (gnarly) growth "rings" is the most likely explanation
     
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