Una figura retorica molto comune era l'allitterazione.

  • Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao,
    secondo me il "the" non ci va. Per "figura retorica" potrebbe andare "literary (oppure poetic) device".
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Più che altro bisognerebbe mettere il soggetto prima del verbo: "allitteration was a very common poetic device".
     

    WR-addict

    Member
    Italian Tuscany
    Figure retoriche (assonanze, allitterazioni,metafore, iperboli ecc..) è spesso tradotto con figures of speech nei testi di letteratura inglese che ho.
     
    Last edited:

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Figures of speech is something altogether different, I'd say, like "un modo di dire". I like Mary's "literary device". You'd only say "the" alliteration" if you were referring to a specific one, like "the alliteration one finds in this poem...".
    Alliteration was a very commonly used literary device.
     

    WR-addict

    Member
    Italian Tuscany
    Figures of speech is something altogether different, I'd say, like "un modo di dire"
    Hmmm... I wouldn’t be so categoric.:cool:
    An alliteration is a figure of speech (of the signifier).
    A metaphor is a figure of speech ( of the meaning).
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Figure of speech | rhetoric "In European languages figures of speech are generally classified in five major categories: (1) figures of resemblance or relationship (e.g., simile, metaphor, kenning, conceit, parallelism, personification, metonymy, synecdoche, and euphemism); (2) figures of emphasis or understatement (e.g., hyperbole, litotes, rhetorical question, antithesis, climax, bathos, paradox, oxymoron, and irony); (3) figures of sound (e.g., alliteration, repetition, anaphora, and onomatopoeia); (4) verbal games and gymnastics (e.g., pun and anagram); and (5) errors (e.g., malapropism, periphrasis, and spoonerism)".
     

    WR-addict

    Member
    Italian Tuscany
    Figure of speech | rhetoric "In European languages figures of speech are generally classified in five major categories: (1) figures of resemblance or relationship (e.g., simile, metaphor, kenning, conceit, parallelism, personification, metonymy, synecdoche, and euphemism); (2) figures of emphasis or understatement (e.g., hyperbole, litotes, rhetorical question, antithesis, climax, bathos, paradox, oxymoron, and irony); (3) figures of sound (e.g., alliteration, repetition, anaphora, and onomatopoeia); (4) verbal games and gymnastics (e.g., pun and anagram); and (5) errors (e.g., malapropism, periphrasis, and spoonerism)".
    :thumbsup::)
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    Figures of speech is something altogether different, I'd say, like "un modo di dire". I like Mary's "literary device". You'd only say "the" alliteration" if you were referring to a specific one, like "the alliteration one finds in this poem...".
    Alliteration was a very commonly used literary device.
    Well, rrose, despite your beatdown by @Mary49 on this one, your suggestion about the use of the article was correct. One would use "The alliteration one finds in this poem ..." to refer to a specific occurrence but no article is required for general statements such as "Alliteration was a very commonly used literary device."

    Get up off the mat, Rocky, you can still win this one!

    Phil
     
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