Una grattugia arrugginita

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DesertCat

Senior Member
inglese | English
How would you render "grattugia arruginita" ? The literal "rusted grater" doesn't make much sense in English.

The context is part of a description of someone:
.... forse perche è francese e parla con una errre che a me sembra una grattugia arrugginita.

Thanks.
 
  • You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    It's interesting that the expression "to grate" means "to be a source of irritation" or "to make a rough sound". I don't know whether that translates into Italian tho'. Grating cheese on a grater, even a rusty one, wouldn't make an irritating sound, but rubbing something metallic against it would, I suppose.
     

    Girino

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    DesertCat said:
    How would you render "grattugia arruginita" ? The literal "rusted grater" doesn't make much sense in English.

    The context is part of a description of someone:
    .... forse perche è francese e parla con una errre che a me sembra una grattugia arrugginita.

    Thanks.
    Charles and carrickp have given you the sense, but if if you want a brief but non-literal rendering I'd say something like "perhaps because he is French and when he speaks his r's sound like a (rusty hinge).

    Which reminds me that Kurt Vonnegut, who was from Indianapolis, once said that the Indiana accent sounded like "a bandsaw cutting sheet metal".
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    well, my cents...
    the issue here is to understend what the writer wanted to convey using grattugia arruginita as a comparison for the 'r' sound.
    was the sound weird, harsh, strong, irritating and so on...?

    from my point of view, grattugia arruginita can be rendered into a broken (old) grater, a grater that's not working like it's supposed to do.
     
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