Under no account (inversion)

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Nelli21

Member
Russian-Russia
Hello,

You must not touch the dog!
If I want to use the inversion, should I say: "Under no account must you.." or "Under no account are you to...?

Is there any difference?

Thank you!
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    What kind of rule are you thinking about?

    Are you thinking about the position of the verb? If you front an element that is negative, the next element has to be a verb. If you front something else, it might still be possible to have the subject come immediately after.

    In some situations people might say that.
    Under no circumstances can anyone say that.
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Does this rule apply to this kind of sentences -
    Neither my roommate is proficient in French, nor is our friend who lives upstairs.

    Is the above correct?
     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    No, I'm afraid that doesn't work.

    However, you can say, 'My is not proficient in French; neither is our friend who lives upstairs'.
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thank you. You omitted the word roommate - is there anything wrong with it by chance? By that I mean a guy who shares a room with the other guy (say, in a student hostel)
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Or if you use neither/nor, you need to pull the verb to the end: Neither my roommate, nor our friend who lives upstairs, is proficient in French.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Thank you. You omitted the word roommate - is there anything wrong with it by chance? By that I mean a guy who shares a room with the other guy (say, in a student hostel)
    Sorry, my mistake. It should be 'my roommate'. Yes, for me that means someone who shares a room with me. (Americans might also use it to mean flatmate.)
     
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