under the sway of

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cyaxares_died

Banned
Deutsch
I used the locution "under the sway of" in the following paragraph. My dictionary states that "under the sway of" is old-fashioned. Does it sound fairly natural in my passage though? Otherwise, could you recommend something to replace it with?

"Of course the local population’s opposition to the terminal has already been instrumentalised by political parties, who try to improve their rating with the locals, especially in view of the on-coming presidential elections. However, these parties are equally part of the same political system under the sway of businessmen and locals are painfully aware of this."
 
  • salsero_siempre03

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    "Under the sway of" does sound a bit archaic but then again I noticed that you use british spelling so that also could influence your choice of words. See if any of the following sound good to you....

    However, these parties are equally part of the same political system under the influence of businessmen...

    However, these parties are equally part of the same political system influenced by businessmen...

    However, these parties are equally part of the same political system under the control of businessmen...

    However, these parties are equally part of the same political system controlled by businessmen...
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I would suggest it's something that no-one would say in everyday life, but it's in the journalist's toolbox, and it's common enough in journalism that we're all familiar with it as an everyday expression. It doesn't really sound old-fashioned.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I wouldn't call it archaic either. It's formal and finds its way into journalistic and academic prose. I could imagine it being used in a university tutorial.
     

    spshone

    New Member
    English
    Hi there,

    Sounds odd to me; maybe it is too old fashioned. A more typical way of saying it, to English ears at least, is to use "hold sway" - this means a rearrangement in you sentence:

    "Of course the local population’s opposition to the terminal has already been instrumentalised by political parties, who try to improve their rating with the locals, especially in view of the on-coming presidential elections.

    However, the locals are more than aware that it is the Businessmen who hold sway over the Politicians.

    (Same as saying, "who control the Politicians")

    Best regards,

    S.
     
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