Under what name

Tostyleun

Senior Member
Kannada - India
Can you form a question using under at the beginning of a sentence?

"Under what name is the room booked?

Thank you.
 
  • LaMercyArt

    New Member
    In my opinion, that particular sentence sounds clumsy. Unless the speaker is trying to sound dramatic, then maybe.
    But if your question is just a general one, how about:
    Under what circumstances would that comment be inappropriate?
    Under our current leadership, we all may be doomed. (just a random sentence - no specific place or person in mind)
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Yes, you can. It wouldn't be my first choice:

    What name was the room booked under?
    Under what name was the room booked?
     

    Tostyleun

    Senior Member
    Kannada - India
    Perfect. Now can answer without using name? I mean "can you book a room under nickson? Instead of saying under the name?.

    Thank you sir.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I think we'd use 'for' when omitting 'name':

    I've got a table booked under the name of Nickson.
    I've got a table booked in the name of Nickson.
    I've got a table booked for Nickson.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think "under" is not the best preposition for the job. "In what name is the room booked?" is better.
    I can think of several hotels where the receptionist might ask "Under what name is the room booked?" But not at a Travelodge or a Holiday Inn Express.
     
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