unemployed /employed

Kacy.H

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, everyone

I paraphrased the essay question, but my teacher said "Inaccurate paraphrase".

Question :Some people argue that it is better to be unemployed than to be employed in jobs they do not enjoy.
To what extent do you agree or disagree?


My paraphrase: It is argued that if people do not have fun doing their job, they should resign themselves from that job rather than staying in it. This essay completely agrees with this statement because passion is the key to career success and one should not sacrifice mental health for money.


Doesn't "unemployed" in the question mean "a person doesn't like his job so he quit"?
It shouldn't mean "unable to find a job", should it?

What do you think of my paraphrase?

Thanks
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Unemployed means not having a job – none of the additional information you're attaching to it. So I can't agree with your paraphrase.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I think the original sentence suggests that some out-of-work people use "It's better to be unemployed than to be employed in jobs they do not enjoy" as an excuse not to look for a job - rather than, as your sentence suggests, that you should make yourself unemployed if you are not happy in your work.
     

    grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    To me your paraphrase is not bad - it uses a quite specific example to illustrate what's actually said in the original passage. What I'd object to, however, is the replacement of 'enjoy' with 'have fun' - in my opinion they are not the same in this context.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    So, how about:

    It is argued that no having a job is better than staying in a job that people are not happy doing.

    Thanks
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Unemployed means not having a job – none of the additional information you're attaching to it. So I can't agree with your paraphrase.
    Hi, Copyright.
    My teacher says I shouldn't use "staying in a job" to paraphrase "employed" either, because in this way I am implying that the people should leave their jobs or that they already have jobs but this is not in the question.

    So, I rewrote: It is argued that not having a job is better than engaging in work that people are not happy doing.

    What do you think? Is the new version accurate?

    Thanks
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would keep the descriptions parallel, not have "having a job" in the first part, and "engaging in work" in the second part. You can see the same sort of parallelism in the original, with "unemployed" and "employed." Also, I don't like "It is argued" – if it is people arguing, I think you might want to keep "people."

    Original:
    Some people argue that it is better to be unemployed than to be employed in jobs they do not enjoy.

    Your paraphrase:
    It is argued that not having a job is better than engaging in work that people are not happy doing. (With notes above.)

    Suggestions:
    Some people argue that not having a job is better than having a job you're not happy doing.
    Some people contend that not having a job is better than having a job you don't like.


    I don't know what the point of the paraphrase is for such a straightforward original sentence, unless it's just an exercise, so I don't know if you have to change every section or if you can leave some alone, e.g. "do not enjoy."
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I would keep the descriptions parallel, not have "having a job" in the first part, and "engaging in work" in the second part. You can see the same sort of parallelism in the original, with "unemployed" and "employed." Also, I don't like "It is argued" – if it is people arguing, I think you might want to keep "people."

    Original:
    Some people argue that it is better to be unemployed than to be employed in jobs they do not enjoy.

    Your paraphrase:
    It is argued that not having a job is better than engaging in work that people are not happy doing. (With notes above.)

    Suggestions:
    Some people argue that not having a job is better than having a job you're not happy doing.
    Some people contend that not having a job is better than having a job you don't like.


    I don't know what the point of the paraphrase is for such a straightforward original sentence, unless it's just an exercise, so I don't know if you have to change every section or if you can leave some alone, e.g. "do not enjoy."
    Thank you so much for such a detail explanation.
    I was writing the introduction of the essay. My teacher said I can't copy words from the essay question. I need to paraphrase. Actually, he told me to write "It is argued that" :)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm not a fan of the repetition of "It is argued that it is better to be ..."

    Maybe "Some think that it is better to be ..." if you don't want to repeat "people." Or "Some people believe ..." because if they didn't believe, they wouldn't argue the point.
     
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