unhealthy condition

jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
1) This company is in unhealthy condition because they borrowed too much money which they can't pay off.
2) This car is in unhealthy condition because it looks like most parts are wearing out.

Are my usages of "in unhealthy condition" correct above? Thank you!
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    No.

    Neither example is correct.

    In (1) This company is in an unhealthy financial condition because they borrowed too much money which they can't pay off.

    (2) is simply unidiomatic. Even if you wrote "This car is in unhealthy mechanical condition because it looks like most of its engine parts are wearing out.", it still does not sound idiomatic. Unhealthy implies a sickness, being worn out is not a sickness.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    No.

    Neither example is correct.

    In (1) This company is in an unhealthy financial condition because they borrowed too much money which they can't pay off.

    (2) is simply unidiomatic. Even if you wrote "This car is in unhealthy mechanical condition because it looks like most of its engine parts are wearing out.", it still does not sound idiomatic. Unhealthy implies a sickness, being worn out is not a sickness.
    Thank you, PaulQ.
    If I say "The car in unhealthty mechnical condition because most parts are malfunctioning." Is it correct and idiomatic?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    No, it is not. Motor vehicles and other mechanical devices and "unhealthy condition" do not collocate. "Unhealthy" means "sick" or "unhygienic".

    Please do not try any more variations. They will be wrong. :thumbsup:

    You can use "unhealthy" predicatively with a car or any machine: "Listen to the engine... it is knocking and banging, it sounds really unhealthy." (i.e. as if it is sick/ill.)
     
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