université / faculté / fac

InV15iblefrog

Senior Member
English - British
Bonjour

I'm not sure what a native would say.
Can someone please explain whether a native french speaker would call a university

"l'universite" or "le fac"

or something else.

Many thanks
Ifrog
 
Last edited:
  • fdr2

    Senior Member
    British English
    I had this question when I was at uni in Montpellier. I asked someone but can't remember which way round it is - but her opinion was that one referred more to the campus, and the other more to the establishment. Sorry not to be able to help entirely!
     

    InV15iblefrog

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I had this question when I was at uni in Montpellier. I asked someone but can't remember which way round it is - but her opinion was that one referred more to the campus, and the other more to the establishment. Sorry not to be able to help entirely!
    That's helpful as well. Thanks. :)

    The thing is here, in the sentence, either will do (campus or establishment), so you've basically answered my question!:D
     

    petit1

    Senior Member
    français - France
    It is "la fac" for "la faculté.
    The "Facultés" (Lettres, Sciences, Droit, Médecine, ....) are part of "une université".
     

    petit1

    Senior Member
    français - France
    in fact we use both. We would say "je suis inscrit à la "fac de droit" or "mon fils est à l'université."
    When we speak, we never say "la faculté" without precising "de Lettres" for example. We always use the abbreviation "la fac".
     

    Vigie

    Member
    France - native French
    Bonjour Ifrog !

    I will give you my own interpretation of the two terms :
    - Université (f): name given to a higher education institution.
    Par exemple : Université de Provence, Université Blaise Pascal, Université Toulouse I, etc.
    - Faculté (f): sub-division of the université according to the academical subject. There can be several facultés within
    the same université.
    Par exemple : Faculté de médecine, Faculté de Physique, etc.

    I hope this makes it clearer for you.

    Vigie
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    InV15iblefrog

    Senior Member
    English - British
    in fact we use both. We would say "je suis inscrit à la "fac de droit" or "mon fils est à l'université."
    When we speak, we never say "la faculté" without precising "de Lettres" for example. We always use the abbreviation "la fac".

    Ahh, ok. That'd be useful for my speaking exam soon.

    Thanks

    I hope this makes it clearer for you.

    Definitely does, actually to the extent that now i'm going to use both in my writing and speaking piece!

    Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    And as also mentioned in the Français seulement thread, in oral speech, in France, quite colloquially, we would simply use "la fac" for "université":
    "Mon frère a commencé à travailler juste après son bac, mais moi, je suis allé à la fac."
    "Demain, je vais m'inscrire à la fac (de droit/de lettres/...)."
    "Il y a un arrêt de tram juste devant la fac."

    To be honest, in oral speech, I've rarely used "université", except to say something like:
    "Oxford et Cambridge possèdent de belles universités."
     

    InV15iblefrog

    Senior Member
    English - British
    And as also mentioned in the Français seulement thread, in oral speech, in France, quite colloquially, we would simply use "la fac" for "université"
    To be honest, in oral speech, I've rarely used "université", except to say something like:
    "Oxford et Cambridge possèdent de belles universités."
    Thanks; this will be useful in my speaking exam.
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    Thanks Pedro y La Torre; is that out of just natural habit, or because it means something slightly different, e.g. by idiom?

    "Fac" is Franco-French and a faculté is simply what we call a faculty (that would be the logic, I suppose). Why the French extend the term to the entire university institution, I don't know.
     
    Top