Unknown language: boutchie

egitto78

Member
Italian - Italy
Hi. This word could be Flemish, i suppose. But maybe it's a French slang, for example, argot. I don't know. Anyway. My question is: what boutchie means?
I think it could be a pet name, a term of endearment. I've read this word for calling a girl. Maybe it means pet, or puppy, or pup, or cub, or whelp, in a loving way.
Am I right? Please, answer.... it's important, even if it doesn't seem....
 
  • Joannes

    Senior Member
    Belgian Dutch
    People can come up with strange words to call their lovers. Sometimes it means something, sometimes it doesn't. "Boutchie" doesn't really mean anything in Dutch (Flemish).
     

    egitto78

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    mmh... Joannes. Do you think that this invented name could match also for calling a friend? from a boy to a girl, but just in friendship? Or do you think that this kind of invented names is appropriate only between lovers? That's the important point!!!!
     

    Joannes

    Senior Member
    Belgian Dutch
    That's hard to tell. People invent names as (just) nicknames for (just) friends too. Since these words are invented by the speakers, there is no difference between 'only for lovers' and 'also for friends' established (yet).
    If you want to produce a lover-to-lover term yourself you could go for classics like schat(je), liefste, lieveling or one of the tons of alternatives.
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    Hi. This word could be Flemish, i suppose. But maybe it's a French slang, for example, argot. I don't know. Anyway. My question is: what boutchie means?
    I think it could be a pet name, a term of endearment. I've read this word for calling a girl. Maybe it means pet, or puppy, or pup, or cub, or whelp, in a loving way.
    Am I right? Please, answer.... it's important, even if it doesn't seem....
    It reminds me of the second part of the Dutch word 'schatteboutje'.
    But it's weird: that word hardly (never?) gets shortened to 'boutje', and as you can see, it's written in a completely different way.
    Do you have a more precise context, I mean, really the sentence in which you read it?

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     
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